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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 12: Greece and other lands 1867; aet. 48 (search)
ts in its present form. Gilmour proposes to go to New York and to change its form and character to that of a weekly newspaper. I of course retire from it and, indeed, despite my title of editor, have been only a reader of manuscripts and contributor — nothing more. I have not had power of any sort to make engagements. The tenth number of Northern Lights was also the last, and we hear no more of the ill-fated magazine. The Journal says nothing of the proposed trip to Greece, until February 15:-- I had rather die, it seems to me, than decide wrongly about going to Europe and leaving the children. And yet I am almost sure I shall do so. Chev clearly wishes me to go. ... Whether I go or stay, God help me to make the best of it. My desire to help Julia is a strong point in favor of the journey. It would be, I think, a turning-point for her. Later she writes:-- Chev has taken our passage in the Asia, which sails on the 13th proximo. So we have the note of preparation,
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 2: a Roman winter--1878-1879; aet. 59-60 (search)
expressing the gratitude of the Cretans to dear Papa for his efforts in their behalf. .... Mr. Rainieri made a suitable address in French--to which I replied in the same tongue. Coffee and cordial were served. The occasion was of great interest. . . In the afternoon spoke at Mrs. Felton's of the Advancement of Women as promoted by association. An American dinner of perhaps forty, nearly all women, Greek, but understanding English. A good occasion. To party at Madame Schliemann's. February 15. Miserable with a cold. A confused day in which nothing seemed to go right. Kept losing sight of papers and other things. Felt as if God could not have made so bad a day — my day after all; I made it. February 18. To ball at the Palace. King took Maud out in the German. February 21. The day for eating the roast lamb with the Cretan chiefs. Went down to the Piraeus warmly wrapped up.... Occasion most interesting. Much speech-making and toasting. I mentioned Felton. February
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 12: Stepping westward 1901-1902; aet. 82-83 (search)
nkling of first steps to be taken with regard to Sig. Leoni's parchment. That is, to have it bought by some public society. I went to work again on my prize poem, with better success than hitherto ... February 14. Philosophy at Mrs. Bullard's.... Sent off my prize poem with scarcely any hope of its obtaining or indeed deserving the prize, but Mar An editor. has promised to pay me something for it in any case, and I was bound to try for the object, namely, a good civic poem . . February 15.... A day of great pleasure, profit and fatigue ... Griggs's lecture.... The address on Erasmus and Luther was very inspiring. Griggs is in the full tide of youthful inspiration and gives himself to his audience without stint. He did not quite do justice to the wonderful emancipation of thought which Protestantism has brought to the world, but his illustration of the two characters was masterly. I said afterwards to Fanny Ames: He will burn himself out. She thinks that he is wisely co