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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 4: Bristol County. (search)
on to the payment of State aid to soldiers' families. November 16th, The free use of the city hall was granted to Mrs. Richard Borden and Mrs. Mary A. Brayton for the purpose of lectures, tableaux, &c., the proceeds to be given to the soldiers. December 21st, A lot in Oak-Grove Cemetery, directly in front of the entrance, was set apart as a soldiers' burial-place. Colonel Richard Borden has erected a splendid marble monument on this lot, with tablets and military emblems. 1864. February 20th. A committee was appointed to make arrangements for the reception of Company G, Twenty-sixth Regiment. Two thousand dollars were appropriated to pay expenses attending enlistment services. April 4th, The bounty to volunteers for three years service was fixed at one hundred and twenty-five dollars. June 8th, A committee was appointed to make arrangements for the reception of Companies A and B of the Seventh Regiment Massachusetts Volunteers. 1865. May 17th, It was voted as follows:—
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 6: Essex County. (search)
giments, and did good service in the common cause. 1864. July 5th, The mayor was requested to call a public meeting of citizens, to take measures to enlist volunteers in anticipation of another call of the President for more men. 1865. February 20th, The quota of the city being full, the mayor, notwithstanding, was directed to continue recruiting men for the service, and to pay each volunteer a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars. Newburyport furnished thirteen hundred and s and uncompromising devotion to the Federal Union, we will raise our quota of men before the 5th of January, 1864. The selectmen were directed to take such measures as they may deem best to carry out the purpose of the resolution. 1864. February 20th, Four thousand dollars were appropriated for recruiting purposes, to be expended under the authority of the selectmen, December 18th, The bounty to volunteers for three years service was fixed at one hundred and twenty-five dollars. Saugus
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 7: Franklin County. (search)
lation to the war during this year. 1863. November 3d, Voted, that a committee of twelve be raised to circulate a subscription paper among the tax-payers, each signer pledging himself to pay his proportion of such a sum as may be paid to secure twenty volunteers for the United-States service. November 23d, Voted, to raise fifteen hundred dollars by subscription to procure volunteers, said sums to be equally apportioned on the subscribers according to their polls and estates. 1864. February 20th, A committee of three was appointed to act with the selectmen to procure volunteers to fill the quota of the town under the last call of the President. Two thousand dollars were appropriated for the payment of bounties. April 16th. Thirty-seven hundred dollars and fifty cents were appropriated to defray the expenses of filling the last quota, and fifteen hundred dollars to refund subscriptions. The selectmen were authorized to continue recruiting until March, 1865; to pay to each volu
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 10: Middlesex County. (search)
9th of April. 1862. March 3d, The treasurer was authorized to borrow whatever amount of money was necessary for the payment of State aid to the families of volunteers. July 21st, The selectmen were authorized to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for three years service and be credited to the quota of the town. August 25th, A bounty of one hundred dollars was authorized to be paid to each volunteer for nine months service. 1863. February 20th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow money for the payment of State aid during the year to the families of soldiers. 1864. July 11th, The treasurer was directed to borrow, not exceeding four thousand dollars—the rate of interest not to exceed six per cent—for the payment of bounties to volunteers enlisting to the credit of the town upon any call of the President for men, after the 1st of March, 1864, and before the 1st of March, 1865, each volunteer to receive one hundred and twent