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y-first, 1864, from headquarters Department of the Cumberland, I left Calhoun, Tenn., Monday, February twenty-second, 1864, in command of six hundred (600) men, (three hundred and fifty mounted infantry and two hundred and fifty cavalry) and marched out on the Spring Place road. Monday evening I encamped near the house of Mr. Waterhouse, on Connassauga River, about thirty miles south of Calhoun. I met no enemy during the day. I left my encampment near Waterhouse's Tuesday morning, February twenty-third, at seven o'clock A. M., (having communicated with General Crufts at Red Clay the night before,) and marched toward Dalton. My advance-guard drove in the enemy's videttes when within four miles of Dalton. I immediately pushed on my column rapidly and attacked a regiment of rebel infantry which was encamped within three miles of Dalton, driving them from their camp and capturing twelve prisoners belonging to a Mississippi regiment. The enemy then formed, and I withdrew my command t
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 95.-reconnoissance to Dalton, Ga. (search)
Doc. 95.-reconnoissance to Dalton, Ga. A national account. three miles beyond Ringgold, Ga., February 23. It will be long before the Fourteenth army corps will forget the period of anxious expectation which commenced on Saturday, the thirteenth day of February, and only ended on Sunday, the twenty-first of the same month. During all the intervening time, the troops composing the Fourteenth corps, and those of Stanley's division, at least, of the Fourth corps, were held in constant readiness to move, and once or twice actually loaded up their wagons for the purpose of marching. But as often as they got ready, that often the order was countermanded, and the movement postponed, until the morning of the twenty-second. The general object of this movement may be stated in a few words. It had a two-fold, and, in a certain eventuality, a three-fold design. The aspect of things in East-Tennessee had been somewhat threatening, from the time we made our unfortunate advance
. The cavalry did a similar work east to the State line, and the Sixteenth army corps north to Lauderdale Springs. This grand crossing of the main railroads of the south-west, at Meridian, is crossed out for the war, and the tax in kind will hardly be wagoned out of Mississippi to any great extent. February twentieth, commenced our return march, making sixteen miles. February twenty-first, marched fourteen miles to Decatur. February twenty-second, marched eighteen miles. February twenty-third, marched twelve miles to Hillsboro. Found the graves of Walker (company I) and Griggs, privates of the Thirteenth Iowa, both murdered after being captured, as narrated above. February twenty-fourth, the Iowa brigade marched twenty-three miles in eight hours and a half, to Pearl River, to guard pioneers in building bridges over the river on the Canton road. February twenty-fifth, finished the bridge and crossed to-day. February twenty-sixth, marched thirteen miles to Canton,
eight miles; arrived there at half-past 12 P. M. I was there ordered by the General commanding the division, to move on the road toward Dalton, and, if possible, find the enemy. I advanced three miles to Wade's farm, and found the enemy's pickets, drove them, and directed Captain Van Antwerp, with his company of Fourth Michigan cavalry, to pursue them, which he did promptly, one and a half miles. Upon the cavalry rejoining the brigade, we returned to Red Clay and rested for the night. February 23d. Marched with the division via Dr. Lee's house twelve miles, to near Catoosa Springs, Georgia, to make a junction with Fourteenth corps; arrived there about nine o'clock P. M. February 24th. Marched back east to Dr. Lee's house, with division. I was here directed to move south-east toward Dalton, crossing the ridge three miles north of the place known as Tunnel Hill, with my infantry and one section of artillery, the latter under command of Lieutenant Stansbury. I passed the first