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hteen mules and sets of harness; 2500 pounds of bacon; two fine horses, saddles, and bridles; about 1000 head of cattle, and one prisoner, G. R. Paul, government agent. All the articles captured I gave to the refugees, as they were of no use to us. The estimate value of the above property to the rebels cannot be less than $3,000,000. That is the value put upon it by the most intelligent refugees. List of articles and property destroyed on Goose Creek by the boats' crew from the United States steamer Tahoma, February twenty-sixth and twenty-seventh, 1864: Two thousand bushels of salt in barrels and bins; three corn-cribs, containing about 1000 bushels; large quantity of hay and fodder; blacksmith's shop and tools; carpenter's shop and tools; about 100 store and other houses, stables, etc.; 165 kettles and pans, average capacity, 100 gallons; 53 large boilers, of about 800 gallons capacity each; 98 well-constructed brick furnaces; nine wagons and carts, 20 sets mule harness.
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 95.-reconnoissance to Dalton, Ga. (search)
el Hill Ridge; and just at dark, as myself and another gentleman were conversing with one of the citizens, the rebel videttes took occasion to hurl at us a half-dozen bullets. This we took as a gentle hint to retire, and riding through the town rejoined our forces, just as General Johnson, who did not think it prudent to remain there all night with a single brigade, was giving orders to fall back to the main body of our forces, encamped about three miles from Ringgold. Tunnel Hill, Ga., February 26. It was somewhat late on Wednesday morning before our column again got in motion; but when it did move, it was with strength which augured well for its success, whatever it might undertake. Our cavalry, about seven hundred strong, all the detachments now operating together under command of Colonel Harrison, took the advance, immediately supported by General King's brigade. Other portions of General Johnson's, Davis's, and Baird's divisions, followed. It was a gallant array, and th
second, marched eighteen miles. February twenty-third, marched twelve miles to Hillsboro. Found the graves of Walker (company I) and Griggs, privates of the Thirteenth Iowa, both murdered after being captured, as narrated above. February twenty-fourth, the Iowa brigade marched twenty-three miles in eight hours and a half, to Pearl River, to guard pioneers in building bridges over the river on the Canton road. February twenty-fifth, finished the bridge and crossed to-day. February twenty-sixth, marched thirteen miles to Canton, county-seat of Madison County, remaining four days, the town guarded by the Iowa brigade. March first to fourth, marched sixty-four miles to Vicksburgh. Some skirmishing. Lieutenant Kilpatrick, with nine men, was captured while out foraging. As the result of our expedition, we cut off the rebel supplies from this State, demonstrated the ability of our veterans to go where they please, brought in some two hundred and fifty prisoners of war, a
fternoon, having heavy skirmishing and artillery practice in the mean time, the enemy occupying the ridge and valley south of the creek that I had possession of the day before. With ten thousand more men on our left, Dalton, no doubt, would have fallen an easy prey to our arms. At night, the object of the reconnoissance being ended, we were ordered, and, with the division, retired to Dr. Lee's farm, on the west of the Tunnel Hill range of ridges, and three miles north of that place. February 26th. At about nine o'clock A. M., I moved my command south-east one mile, on to the ridge two miles north of the Tunnel, threw out some skirmishers on the eastern slope, met some rebel cavalry that were attempting to follow us, and drove them out of sight and hearing. In the evening, moved down south-west into the valley at Israel's house; rested until nine o'clock P. M. Was ordered and marched westward to the Stone Church, near Catoosa Platform, and rested the balance of the night. Feb