Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for February 27th or search for February 27th in all documents.

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ghteen mules and sets of harness; 2500 pounds of bacon; two fine horses, saddles, and bridles; about 1000 head of cattle, and one prisoner, G. R. Paul, government agent. All the articles captured I gave to the refugees, as they were of no use to us. The estimate value of the above property to the rebels cannot be less than $3,000,000. That is the value put upon it by the most intelligent refugees. List of articles and property destroyed on Goose Creek by the boats' crew from the United States steamer Tahoma, February twenty-sixth and twenty-seventh, 1864: Two thousand bushels of salt in barrels and bins; three corn-cribs, containing about 1000 bushels; large quantity of hay and fodder; blacksmith's shop and tools; carpenter's shop and tools; about 100 store and other houses, stables, etc.; 165 kettles and pans, average capacity, 100 gallons; 53 large boilers, of about 800 gallons capacity each; 98 well-constructed brick furnaces; nine wagons and carts, 20 sets mule harness.
Doc. 122.-Sherman's Mississippi expedition. Despatch from General Sherman. Vicksburgh, February 27, via Cairo, March 10, 1864. Lieutenant-General Grant, care of Major-General Halleck: General: I got in this morning from Canton, where I left my army in splendid heart and condition. We reached Jackson February sixth, crossed the Pearl, and passed through Brandon to Morton, where the enemy made dispositions for battle, but fled in the night. We posted on over all obstacles, and reached Meridian February fourteenth. General Polk, having a railroad to assist him in his retreat, escaped across the Tombigbee on the seventeenth. We staid at Meridian a week, and made the most complete destruction of the railroads ever beheld — south below Quitman, east to Cuba Station, twenty miles north to Lauderdale Springs, and west all the way back to Jackson. I could hear nothing of the cavalry force of General William Smith ordered to be there by February tenth. I inclose by mail this
day until Saturday morning, and it appeared like a month. I have no time to write more; will write again soon. Love to all. Your daughter, S. E. P. B. Operations of the cavalry under Generals Smith and Grierson. Memphis, Tenn., February 27. From an officer attached to General Grierson's column of the cavalry expedition, which returned yesterday, the following memoranda of the march of that command was obtained. February 11th, marched from Germantown, Tennessee, crossed thelis's and Hepburn's brigades marched to Germantown, on the Memphis and Charleston Railroad, fourteen miles from Memphis, and Waring's brigade crossed the Wolf River near Colliersville, and moved slowly toward Memphis, where it arrived on twenty-seventh February, again crossing the Wolf River at Shelby's Ferry. The loss of the entire command in men killed, wounded, and missing was about three hundred and fifty; in horses, nearly three thousand. By this retreat General Sherman was deprived of
6th. At about nine o'clock A. M., I moved my command south-east one mile, on to the ridge two miles north of the Tunnel, threw out some skirmishers on the eastern slope, met some rebel cavalry that were attempting to follow us, and drove them out of sight and hearing. In the evening, moved down south-west into the valley at Israel's house; rested until nine o'clock P. M. Was ordered and marched westward to the Stone Church, near Catoosa Platform, and rested the balance of the night. February 27th. Started at twelve o'clock M., and marched to Ewing's farm, north nine miles, and camped for the night. February 28th. Marched at seven o'clock A. M. Arrived in camp at this place at twelve o'clock M. Command in good condition. I can with pleasure refer to the prompt and willing cooperation and obedience of the officers and men of my command during this short campaign, and I regard myself as truly fortunate, in being surrounded by first-class officers, both of infantry and artill