Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for February 27th or search for February 27th in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
eople and telling them a story of the war, of which, like Aeneas, he can say: All of which I saw, and others may add: A great part part of which you were. This gallant soldier, engaged in so honorable and patriotic a task, well deserves the attention which it is your purpose to bestow, and I renew the expression of regret that circumstances beyond my control do not permit me to be with you on the occasion of his visit. Faithfully yours, Jefferson Davis. On Tuesday night, the 27th of February, there assembled at the Washington Artillery armory one of the largest and most brilliant audiences we have ever seen. The lady patronesses of the occasion, numbering over one hundred, occupied rows of front seats, and in their tasteful attire, and with their knots of red and white roses and ribbons on their bosoms, lent a grace and charm to the occasion. The platform was most artistically and appropriately decorated. Stacks of muskets were on the flanks—two small cannon, Redemption
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
eople and telling them a story of the war, of which, like Aeneas, he can say: All of which I saw, and others may add: A great part part of which you were. This gallant soldier, engaged in so honorable and patriotic a task, well deserves the attention which it is your purpose to bestow, and I renew the expression of regret that circumstances beyond my control do not permit me to be with you on the occasion of his visit. Faithfully yours, Jefferson Davis. On Tuesday night, the 27th of February, there assembled at the Washington Artillery armory one of the largest and most brilliant audiences we have ever seen. The lady patronesses of the occasion, numbering over one hundred, occupied rows of front seats, and in their tasteful attire, and with their knots of red and white roses and ribbons on their bosoms, lent a grace and charm to the occasion. The platform was most artistically and appropriately decorated. Stacks of muskets were on the flanks—two small cannon, Redemption