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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 96 96 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 73 73 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 13 13 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 1, 1861., [Electronic resource] 11 11 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 9 9 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 8 8 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 8 8 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 8 8 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 6 6 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 5 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them.. You can also browse the collection for February 28th or search for February 28th in all documents.

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his headquarters to the Paw Paw Tunnel, from which position he covered the reconstruction of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, which was reopened from the west to Hancock on the 14th of Feb. On the 13th he made a very dashing attack upon a party of the enemy at Bloomery Gap, taking several prisoners and dispersing the rest. Notwithstanding the severe illness from which he suffered, Lander remained at Paw Paw, covering the railroad and keeping the country — clear of the enemy, until the 28th of Feb., when he was ordered to move to Bunker Hill to co-operate with Gen. Banks, then at Charlestown, covering, the rebuilding of the rail-road as he advanced. While engaged in preparing to execute this order his disease assumed a more violent form, and on the 2d of March this gallant officer breathed his last. On some occasions during this brief campaign I was obliged to check Lander rather abruptly for attempting to assume control over troops not under his command, and for endeavoring to in
ed upon. That evening the quartermaster-general was informed of the decision. Directions were given to secure the transportation; any assistance was tendered. He promptly detailed to this duty two most efficient assistants in his department. Col. Rufus Ingalis was stationed at Annapolis, where it was then proposed to embark the troops, and Capt. Henry C. Hodges was directed to meet me in Philadelphia to attend to chartering the vessels. With these arrangements I left Washington on the 28th Feb. I beg to hand herewith a statement, prepared by Capt. Hodges, of the vessels chartered, which exhibits the prices paid and parties from whom they were taken: 113steamers, at an average price per day,$215 10 188schooners, at an average price per day,24 45 88barges, at an average price per day,14 27 In thirty-seven days from the time I received the order in Washington (and most of it was accomplished in thirty days), these vessels transported from Perryville, Alexandria, and Was
Letters and despatches. Washington, 1861-2 : McClellan's Memorandum, 2d .4ug., 101. To Lincoln, 22d Oct., ‘61, 187 ; 28th Feb., ‘62 195. To Halleck, 11th Nov.,‘61 207 ; 2d Mar., ‘61, 216. To Stanton, 3d Feb., ‘62 229 ; 28th Feb., ‘62. 194; 9th 28th Feb., ‘62. 194; 9th Mar., ‘62, 223. 224. To Cameron, 6th Sept., ‘61, 205 ; 8th Sept., ‘61, 106. To Banks, 21st Oct., 61. 186; 29th Oct.,‘61, 148 To Stone, 20th Oct ,‘61, 182; 21st Oct., ‘61, 185, 186. To Buell, 7th, 12th Nov., ‘61, 210. To Burnside, 7th Jan.,‘62, 206. To T. W. Sherman, 14th Feb., ‘62, 211. To Butler, 23d Feb., ‘62, 212. To Lander. 28th Feb., ‘62, 195. To Grant, 24th Nov , ‘66, 218; 26th Dec , 66, 219.--Lincoln to McClellan, 1st Nov., ‘61, 200; 3d Feb., ‘62, 229 ; 11th Mar.,‘62. 225 ; 31st Mar., ‘62, 164; 4th Apr., ‘62 165.-Stanton to McClellan, 28th Feb., ‘62. 194; 9th Mar; ‘62, 223. To Buchanan, 27th July, ‘61, 67.-Banks to McClellan, 20th Oct., ‘61, 181 ; 21st Oct., ‘61, 183, 18