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The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 96 96 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 73 73 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 13 13 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 1, 1861., [Electronic resource] 11 11 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 9 9 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 8 8 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 8 8 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 8 8 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 6 6 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 5 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: March 6, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for February 28th or search for February 28th in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

Dispatch from Major Anderson. --The Secretary of War received Monday evening another dispatch from Major Anderson, dated Feb. 28. He contradicts the statement that President Davis had been to Charleston. He says that the report that he had been sick is without a particle of foundation. He is in good health, as is also his little band of soldiers. Affairs in Charleston harbor are arriving at a point when further delay on their part will be impossible. Their extensive works of defence and attack are nearly if not quite completed. The feeling between the authorities and himself continues to be friendly, and he is allowed all the facilities that he could expect. Fresh provisions and marketing are supplied in abundance. He experiences no difficulty in sending or receiving his mall matter.
One of the Failures. --We are informed that a few days since a firm in this city succumbed to the pressure of the times, with, as it subsequently appeared, liabilities to the extent of thirty thousand and assets to the extraordinary amount of eight dollars.--Boston Traveller,February 28.
The Daily Dispatch: March 6, 1861., [Electronic resource], The last day of the U. S. Congress. (search)
Shipments for Tennessee. Savannah, March 2. --It has been decided here that all goods shipped via this port for Tennessee must pay duties here, as Tennessee is not one of the Southern Confederacy, unless the goods were purchased before February 28th and loaded in the vessel before March 14.