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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for March or search for March in all documents.

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tured four hundred and ninety-six prisoners and nine pieces of artillery. His loss was ninety killed, four hundred and seventy-eight wounded, and nine missing. In March, the rebel General Pettigrew, with a large force of infantry and artillery, made a demonstration on Newbern, but was forced to abandon the attempt on that place. ainly to the defence of the points which he then occupied. An attack upon Fort Sumter and Charleston had long beet in contemplation by the Navy Department, and in March last it was represented that the operations of the iron-clads and monitors would be greatly facilitated by a land force prepared to assist the attack, and to occupant at Vicksburgh. But the strength of the place was not then known, and General Banks resumed his operations by the Teche and Atchafalaya. In the latter part of March, Colonel Clarke was sent with a small force up the Pontchatoula, and destroyed the railroad bridge at that place. He captured a rebel officer and four privates, a
ise of its rightful functions, as a State of the American Union, under the Constitution of the United States; and as an initiatory step in such reorganization and restoration, it is determined to open and hold an election on the first Saturday in March next, in the various precincts, districts, or wherever it is practicable so to do, in the respective counties of the State, as prescribed by the laws and Constitution of the State, to wit: Justices of the peace, sheriffs, constables, trustees, ciringing the State of Tennessee within the provisions of the Constitution of the United States, which guarantees to each State a republican form of government, I do order said elections to be holden in the various counties on the first Saturday in March next, for the officers aforesaid, and none other. But, inasmuch as these elections are ordered in the State of Tennessee, as a State of the Union under the Federal Constitution, it is not expected that the enemies of the United States will pro
Doc. 96.-capture of Fort de Russy, La. on board flag-ship, Fort de Russy, March 18, 1864. To understand the importance of the great expedition up Red River, it is necessary to review the military situation in the beginning of March. Sherman had returned to Vicksburgh from his grand but disappointing raid into Mississippi, and instead of directing his forces toward Mobile, the point greatest and almost the only position of vital concern to the rebels, he detached a portion of them to General Banks's assistance, who, it appears, had predetermined on scattering or demolishing the forces in West-Louisiana. It is altogether probable that something in the seasons had dictated this choice to General Banks. For example, the Red River is only high enough to be navigable by the largest vessels during this month and the next, while the task of taking Mobile is one which might be undertaken at any time, though it is unaccountably strange that it was not begun in December instead of
g Smith's and the Yazoo River movements, are about as follows: One hundred and fifty miles of railroad, sixty-seven bridges, seven thousand feet of trestle, twenty locomotives, twenty-eight cars, ten thousand bales of cotton, several steam-mills, and over two — million bushels of corn were destroyed. The railroad destruction is complete and thorough. The capture of prisoners exceeds all loss. Upward of eight thousand contrabands and refugees came in with various columns. Journal of the March. Vicksburgh, March 6, 1864. dear Editor: On the third ultimo, Sherman's expedition left Vicksburgh for Meridian, cutting right through the capital and across the centre of proud Mississippi. The army was made up of two divisions--General Veatch's and General A. J. Smith's--Sixteenth army corps, and two divisions--General Leggett's and General Crocker's--Seventeenth army corps; together with Colonel Winslow's brigade of cavalry, and one brigade (General Chambers's) infantry; making i
th instant our District Commander, Colonel Gallup, with his usual sympathy for suffering Unionists, sent a scout over into Western Virginia to rid the citizens of the unscrupulous Colonel Ferguson, who, with his plundering band, had pillaged the country until even the women and children were brought to starvation. This impudent rebel, knowing that Virginia was not in this district, and therefore not under the protection of our gallant Colonel, sent him word that he would quarter there until March, but would not molest our troops provided we would let him alone. Colonel Gallup treated the message with that silent contempt it deserved. His silence was taken for acquiescence by the other party. So the wily old fox was allowed to play around until he met with an unpleasant surprise in the capture of himself and command. This happened in the following manner: At dark on the evening of the twelfth, a portion of these troops left camp under the lead of the District Commander, and marche