Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for March or search for March in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
o brigades, to be known as the Maryland Line. III. Colonel George H. Steuart, now commanding the First Maryland regiment, is assigned to this duty of organization, re-enlisting for his own regiment, and re-organizing from the material obtained by enlistments and transfers, in accordance with the foregoing law—having command of the whole. By order of the Secretary of War, S. Cooper, Adjutant & Inspector General. Colonel Steuart was promoted to be Brigadier-General in the following March, and on reporting to Major-General Ewell, of Jackson's army in the Valley, was allotted the First Maryland regiment, Brown's troop of cavalry, and the Baltimore Light Artillery, which thus constituted the Maryland Line. During the Campaign of the Valley, however, in the advance he commanded a brigade of cavalry, and it was not until after the battle of Winchester (May 26) that he assumed command of the Line, which was attached to the second brigade Jackson's division, also under Steuart's
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Maryland line in the Confederate Army. (search)
o brigades, to be known as the Maryland Line. III. Colonel George H. Steuart, now commanding the First Maryland regiment, is assigned to this duty of organization, re-enlisting for his own regiment, and re-organizing from the material obtained by enlistments and transfers, in accordance with the foregoing law—having command of the whole. By order of the Secretary of War, S. Cooper, Adjutant & Inspector General. Colonel Steuart was promoted to be Brigadier-General in the following March, and on reporting to Major-General Ewell, of Jackson's army in the Valley, was allotted the First Maryland regiment, Brown's troop of cavalry, and the Baltimore Light Artillery, which thus constituted the Maryland Line. During the Campaign of the Valley, however, in the advance he commanded a brigade of cavalry, and it was not until after the battle of Winchester (May 26) that he assumed command of the Line, which was attached to the second brigade Jackson's division, also under Steuart's
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
ast Tennessee and Georgia, Norfolk and Western, and Richmond and Danville railroads, we met with no accident, suffered no serious detention, encountered nothing but politeness on the part of railroad officials, and had all of the comforts attainable on such a journey. crowded out explains the absence of several articles intended for this number. Several of the articles left with the printer when the Secretary started to Texas the 1st of May, greatly exceeded anticipated length, and left no room for a number of others; but we expect to have out our July number by the 20th of June, and the omitted articles will have an early chance. J. L. McCOWN, Dallas, Texas; will receive our thanks for a very accurate and beautifully-executed photograph of General Fitzhugh Lee, taken when we were there in March. Mr. McCown is an old Lexington (Va.) man, having learned his art with Miley; and we prize his work all the more because he was a gallant Confederate soldier and executed it con amore.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 50 (search)
veral houses at the Navy Yard, silenced several of our land batteries, and came near demolishing Fort McRea. Be the enemy's damage slight as he represented it, it is pregnant with meaning, when he failed to renew the bombardment on the morning of the 24th, after boastfully commencing it two days previous. The Army under General Albert Sidney Johnston at Corinth and Shiloh—General Bragg's forces remained in the successful defence of Pensacola and the Navy Yard, until February or early in March, when the disasters of Fort Donaldson on the Cumberland, and Henry on the Tennessee rivers, together with the evacuation by our forces, and the occupation by the enemy of Southern Kentucky, Middle and West Tennessee, and North Alabama, resulted in a concentration of all our available force under Albert Sidney Johnston, along the line of the Memphis and Charleston railroad, with Corinth as its center and base. Having organized his splendid troops, General Johnston, with General Beauregard
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Unveiling of Valentine's Recumbent figure of Lee at Lexington, Va., June 28th, 1883. (search)
with the richest stores and most approved arms and munitions of war. Time forbids that I prolong the story; and this imperfect sketch is but a dim outline of that grand historic picture in which Robert Lee will ever stand as the foremost figure, challenging and enchaining the reverence and admiration of mankind, the faint suggestion of that magnificent career which has made for him a place on the heights of history as high as warrior's sword has ever carved. Premonitions of the end—the March to Appomattox. Vain was the mighty struggle, led by the peerless Lee. Genius planned, valor executed, patriotism stripped itself of every treasure, and heroism fought and bled and died, and all in vain! When the drear winter of 1864 came at last, there came also premonitions of the end. The very seed-corn of the Confederacy had been ground up, as President Davis said. The people sat at naked tables and slept in sheetless beds, for their apparel had been used to bind up wounds. The weed