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The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Personal Poems (search)
lver-voiced oracle Who lately through her parlors spoke As through Dodona's sacred oak, A wiser truth than any told By Sappho's lips of ruddy gold,— The way to make the world anew, Is just to grow—as Mary Grew! 1871. Sumner. I am not one who has disgraced beauty of sentiment by deformity of conduct, or the maxims of a freeman by the actions of a slave; but, by the grace of God, I have kept my life unsullied. Milton's Defence of the people of England. O Mother State! the winds of March Blew chill o'er Auburn's Field of God, Where, slow, beneath a leaden arch Of sky, thy mourning children trod. And now, with all thy woods in leaf, Thy fields in flower, beside thy dead Thou sittest, in thy robes of grief, A Rachel yet uncomforted! And once again the organ swells, Once more the flag is half-way hung, And yet again the mournful bells In all thy steeple-towers are rung. And I, obedient to thy will, Have come a simple wreath to lay, Superfluous, on a grave that still Is swee
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), At sundown (search)
ory of the autumn leaves. And, if the flowery meed of song To other bards may well belong, Be his, who from the farm-field spoke A word for Freedom when her need Was not of dulcimer and reed. This Isthmian wreath of pine and oak. The wind of March. up from the sea, the wild north wind is blowing Under the sky's gray arch; Smiling, I watch the shaken elm-boughs, knowing It is the wind of March. Between the passing and the coming season, This stormy interlude Gives to our winter-wearied heMarch. Between the passing and the coming season, This stormy interlude Gives to our winter-wearied hearts a reason For trustful gratitude. Welcome to waiting ears its harsh forewarning Of light and warmth to come, The longed — for joy of Nature's Easter morning, The earth arisen in bloom! In the loud tumult winter's strength is breaking; I listen to the sound, As to a voice of resurrection, waking To life the dead, cold ground. Between these gusts, to the soft lapse I hearken Of rivulets on their way; I see these tossed and naked tree-tops darken With the fresh leaves of May. This roar of
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Appendix (search)
Two Elizabeths. Requital. The Wood Giant. The Reunion. Adjustment. An Artist of the Beautiful. A Welcome to Lowell. 1886How the Robin came. Banished from Massachusetts. The Homestead. Revelation. The Bartholdi Statue. Norumbega Hall. Mulford. To a Cape Ann Schooner. Samuel J. Tilden. A Day's Journey. 1887On the Big Horn. A Legacy. 1888The Brown Dwarf of Riigen. Lydia H. Sigourney, Inscription on Tablet. One of the Signers. The Christmas of 1888. 1889The Vow of Washington. O. W. Holmes on his Eightieth Birthday. 1890R. S. S., At Deer Island on the Merrimac. Burning Drift-Wood. The Captain's Well. Haverhill. To G. G. Milton, on Memorial Window. The Last Eve of Summer. To E. C. S. 1891James Russell Lowell. Preston Powers, Inscription for Bass-Relief. The Birthday Wreath. Between the Gates. 1892An Outdoor Reception. The Wind of March. To Oliver Wendell Holmes. [Date unknown.] The Home-Coming of the Bride. Mrs. Choate's House-Warming. Fragment.
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Index of first lines (search)
e world before, III. 238. O Holy Father! just and true, III. 54. Oh, praise an' tanks! De Lord he come, III. 231. Oh, thicker, deeper, darker growing, IV. 110. Oh, well may Essex sit forlorn, IV. 138. O Lady fair, these silks of mine are beautiful and rare, i. 17. Old friend, kind friend! lightly down, IV. 73. Olor Iscanus queries: Why should we, III. 216. O lonely bay of Trinity, IV. 269. O Mother Earth! upon thy lap, III. 131. O Mother State! the winds of March, IV. 127. Once more, dear friends, you meet beneath, III. 241. Once more, O all-adjusting Death, IV. 155. Once more, O Mountains of the North, unveil, II. 55. Once more on yonder laurelled height, IV. 175. One day, along the electric wire, IV. 84. One hymn more, O my lyre, II. 200. One morning of the first sad Fall. IV. 158. One Sabbath day my friend and I, i. 290. O Norah, lay your basket down, i. 120. On page of thine I cannot trace, II. 101. On the isle o
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Index of Titles (search)
, The, IV. 286. Voyage of the Jettie, II. 170. Waiting, The, II. 132. Watchers, The, III. 223. Wedding Veil, The, IV. 331. Welcome to Lowell, A, IV. 152. Well of Loch Maree, The, i. 124. What of the Day, III. 191. What State Street said to South Carolina, IV. 399. What the Birds said, III. 248. What the Traveller said at Sunset, II. 334. What the Voice said, II. 213. Wheeler, Daniel, IV. 48. Wife of Manoah to her Husband, The, II. 217. Wilson, IV. 149. Wind of March, The, IV. 31L Winter Roses, IV. 219. Wishing Bridge, The, II 398. Wish of To-Day, The, III. 233. Witch of Wenham, The, i. 360. Within the Gate, IV. 143. Woman, A, II. 294. Wood Giant, The, II. 91. Word, The, II. 326. Word for the Hour, A, III 218. Wordsworth, IV. 66. World's Convention, The, III. 72. Worship, II. 227. Worship of Nature, The, IV. 282. Wreck of Rivermouth, The, IV. 235. Yankee Girl, The, III. 30. Yorktown, III. 128.