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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 35: Massachusetts and the compromise.—Sumner chosen senator.—1850-1851. (search)
ster's speech of March 7 was received by Northern members of Congress with general disapproval, Boston Atlas, March 9, 13, 14, 1850; Courier, March 11. and by the people of Massachusetts with surprise and indignation. His biographer, G. T. Curtis, admits this adverse opinion, vol. II. p. 410. The Whig press of New England, with rare exceptions, condemned his unexpected movement The rumor, which anticipated the speech in the last days of February, was not credited. (Boston Atlas, March 1.) The Southern leaders had been advised of the tenor of the speech two weeks before it was delivered. (A. II. Stephens's Life, by Johnston and Browne, p. 250.) Webster, as early as January 21, admitted Clay to a confidence as to his purpose which he withheld from his own people. G. T. Curtis's Life of Webster, vol. II. p. 397. and at first only one Whig newspaper The Newburyport Herald. in Massachusetts, outside of Boston, cordially approved it. If a direct popular vote could have be
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 36: first session in Congress.—welcome to Kossuth.—public lands in the West.—the Fugitive Slave Law.—1851-1852. (search)
n finding an adversary's vulnerable points. He was a person without serious aims and with much levity of character, convivial in habits, and in full communion with the society and capital of Boston at this period. a very conservative Whig, in a public speech, to which Wilson, the president, leaving the chair, replied that the senator would speak at the proper time. February 24. Wilson's speech, which contains a review of the politics of the period, appeared in full in the Commonwealth, March 1.> The taunt was repeated in the Whig journal Boston Courier, may 28. at intervals, and by Mr. Winthrop in an appendix to a volume of his speeches. Published late in May. John A. Andrew wrote, June 2, of Winthrop's reference to Sumner's silence: This retreating arrow from Winthrop can do you no harm, and it needs no attention. Winthrop's sharp reflections at this time were prompted by Sumner's including in a recent edition of his Orations and Addresses his letter to Winthrop, Oct. 25,
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 38: repeal of the Missouri Compromise.—reply to Butler and Mason.—the Republican Party.—address on Granville Sharp.—friendly correspondence.—1853-1854. (search)
st honored fellow-citizen, William Rufus King. Sir, I have heard of honor that felt a stain like a wound. If there be any such in this Chamber,—and surely there is,—it will hesitate to take upon itself the stain of this transaction. The speech was listened to with the closest attention from the beginning to the end: and the galleries applauded the description of a Northern man with Southern principles. New York Tribune, February 22; New York Evening Post, February 24; Commonwealth, March 1. The President of the Senate forbade the applause when given to Sumner; but on a succeeding day allowed it without rebuke when given to Douglas. (Pike's First Blows in the Civil War, p. 218.) Douglas in his speech, March 3, treated this description of a Northern man with Southern principles as intended for himself. R. H. Dana, Jr., wrote to Sumner, February 26: Your magnetic mountain is a thing that can neither be hid nor removed; it will be one of the everlasting hills. (Works, vol. I<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 40: outrages in Kansas.—speech on Kansas.—the Brooks assault.—1855-1856. (search)
ote not being necessary, he was not present when the bill, known as the tariff of 1857, passed March 2. Theodore Parker wrote, Feb. 27, 1857— God be thanked you are in your place once more! There has not been an antislavery speech made in the Congress, unless by Giddings, since you were carried out of it,—not one. Now that you bear yourself back again, I hope to hear a blast on that old war trumpet which shall make the North ring and the South tremble. Sumner wrote to Parker, March 1:— I have sat in my seat only on one day. After a short time the torment to my system became great, and a cloud began to gather over my brain. I tottered out and took to my bed. I long to speak, but I cannot. Sorrowfully I resign myself to my condition. Before 1 left home Dr. Howe insisted that I must abandon all thought of speaking, under pain of paralysis, and Dr. Perry urged that I should in all probability have a congestion of the brain if I made the attempt. Had I an internal <
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 43: return to the Senate.—the barbarism of slavery.—Popular welcomes.—Lincoln's election.—1859-1860. (search)
the West and of dominion in the Union, were now busy with preparations for secession and armed revolt. As to the military preparations at the South, see speeches of Miles in the House, Jan. 6, 1860; Van Wyck, March 7; and Mason in the Senate, March 1. Von Hoist, vol. VII. pp. 111-114, 366 note. Nicolay and Hay's Life of Lincoln, vol. II. pp. 300, 333. Another and more eventful period was at hand. The new Capitol, with its ampler dome, and its extended wings covering the representativsion began, did not take his seat till after the holiday recess, had hardly a more friendly reception. As to the military preparations at the South, see speeches of Miles in the House, Jan. 6, 1860; Van Wyck, March 7; and Mason in the Senate, March 1. Von Hoist, vol. VII. pp. 111-114, 366 note. Nicolay and Hay's Life of Lincoln, vol. II. pp. 300, 333. The bitterness of the two sections had increased since Sumner's last participation in the business of the Senate. Their recognition of eac