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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 232 232 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 28 28 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 8 8 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 8 8 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 6 6 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6 6 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 5 5 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 5 5 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 4 4 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 4 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for March 6th or search for March 6th in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 42: Red River expedition.--continued. (search)
e movement on account of bad roads and guerillas, and prefers to remain on the defensive line of the Arkansas. I have replied that he should co-operate with Banks and Sherman, unless you direct otherwise. His objections on account of guerillas threatening his rear will apply equally to an advance at any time into the enemy's country. On the 15th of March, General Halleck, as chief-of-staff, telegraphed to General Grant as follows: A dispatch just received from General Banks, dated March 6. He expects to effect a junction with Sherman's forces (Smith's Division) on Red River, on the 17th. He desires that positive orders be sent to Steele to move in conjunction with them for Red River, with all his available force. Sherman and Banks are of opinion that Steele can do much more than make a demonstration, as he last proposed. A telegram from you might decide him. After reading the above dispatches, we are forced to the conclusion that Generals Halleck and Banks are respon
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 47: operations of South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, under Rear-admiral Dahlgren, during latter end of 1863 and in 1864. (search)
red another success for the Confederates, and was blown up by a torpedo, fifteen miles above Jacksonville — this being the highway to Palatka and above, where Federal troops were being constantly transported. The duty on the river became very hazardous, for a severe torpedo warfare was carried on in small boats during dark nights by the Confederate torpedo corps, which first made its appearance on the Mississippi in 1862. The above operations in Florida of the Army and Navy lasted from March 6th to April 16th, when orders were received from the War Department for the troops to be sent North, in consequence of which the gun-boats were withdrawn; but while employed with the Army, Commander Balch, Lieutenant-Commander S. Livingston Breese, of the Ottawa, and the commanders of the Mahaska and Norwich performed good and gallant service. It must not be supposed that there were not constantly occurring gallant affairs on the Federal side as well as on that of the Confederates; for tho