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nd others, made it historic and heroic. For the raid, the torpedo, and the ram — a modified revival of the old Roman beaked vessel-legitimate modern warfare is indebted to the Confederates. Morgan's first raid was begun on the afternoon of March 7th. With Lieutenant-Colonel Wood, ten rangers, and fifteen of his own squadron, he advanced along by-roads eighteen miles from Murfreesboro toward Nashville that day, and on the next morning marched until he came opposite the lunatic asylum, nearetter of March 18th has been much admired, and comment upon it by the present writer is not called for. President Davis's letters are also given in full, and will be found to reflect equal credit on his head and heart. [Telegram.] Huntsville, March 7-11 A. M. Your dispatch is just received. I sent Colonel Liddell to Richmond on the 28th ult., with the official reports of Generals Floyd and Pillow of the events at Donelson, and suppose that he must have arrived by this time. I also sent
emy. The correspondence between General Beauregard and General Johnston shows that the former was advised of all of General Johnston's movements. General Beauregard wrote from Jackson, Tennessee, March 2d, to General Johnston: I think you ought to hurry up your troops to Corinth by railroad, as soon as practicable, for here or thereabouts will soon be fought the great battle of this controversy. Adjutant-General Mackall telegraphed for General Johnston to General Beauregard, March 7th: The general understands that detachments for this army are coming east. Will you order none to pass the line of road running to Corinth? This, with the other circumstances already given, is conclusive that Corinth was the objective point of General Johnston's march. While engaged in these efforts at concentration, General Johnston fully perceived the necessity of haste in their execution, and it has been seen that all possible speed was made. Immediately after Sherman effe