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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 310 310 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 12 12 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 11 11 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 10 10 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 9 9 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 8 8 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 8 8 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 8 8 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 6 6 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 5 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865. You can also browse the collection for March 10th or search for March 10th in all documents.

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black man equal before the law; first to admit colored children to her common schools. She was first to answer with her blood the alarm-cry of the nation when its capital was menaced by the Rebels. You know her patriotic Governor, and you know Charles Sumner. I need add no more. Massachusetts now welcomes you as her soldiers. . . . In consequence of the cold weather there was some suffering in the regimental camp. When this became known, a meeting was held at a private residence on March 10, and a committee of six ladies and four gentlemen was appointed to procure comforts, necessities, and a flag. Colonel Shaw was present, and gave an account of progress. To provide a fund, a levee was held at Chickering Hall on the evening of March 20, when speeches were made by Ralph Waldo Emerson, Wendell Phillips, Rev. Dr. Neale, Rev. Father Taylor, Judge Russell, and Lieutenant-Colonel Hallowell. Later, through the efforts of Colonel Shaw and Lieutenant-Colonel Hallowell, a special fu
reported on the Fifty-fourth recruits as follows:— The first recruits were sent to Camp Meigs, Readville, in February, 1863; their medical examination was most rigid and thorough, nearly one third of the number offering being peremptorily rejected. As a consequence, a more robust, strong, and healthy set of men were never mustered into the service of the United States. Companies A and B were filled by March 15; Company D was then formed; Company C came to camp from New Bedford on March 10. These four companies were mustered into the United States service on March 30. Lieutenant Partridge on March 28 was assigned to begin Company E; Lieutenant Bridge, reporting from recruiting service, was placed in command of Company F, just forming; Lieutenant Smith, on April 10, was chosen to organize Company G. As recruits came in during April at the rate of one hundred per week, these three companies were ready for muster on April 23. Companies H, I, and K were mustered May 13, complet
ted a new bill equalizing soldiers' pay. By one section colored soldiers were given the same pay as whites from Jan. 1, 1864; another section gave the same bounties to colored as to white volunteers in the loyal States, enlisted under the Act of October, 1863; and still a third gave the same pay to colored soldiers as other volunteers from muster-in, if so pledged to them by authority of the War Department, the Secretary of War to determine the question of fact. This bill passed the Senate March 10, and went to the House. There was still to be the struggle amending the Army Appropriation Bill, that the provisions of the Equalizing Bill could be carried out, if agreed upon by the House. Copies of Mr. Wilson's bill were received by Colonel Hallowell soon after its presentation; and it was ordered read to the enlisted men of every company of the Fifty-fourth, which was done. In Massachusetts the friends of the regiment were, through the committee, doing much to aid the distressed fa