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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General T. J. (Stonewall) Jackson, Confederate States army. (search)
ed his conclusions or devised the combinations which defeated his enemy, for Jackson took no counsel save with his familiar, the Genius of War, and his God. He did hold one, and only one, council of war. In March, 1862, at Winchester, Jackson had in his small army less than 5,000 men. Gen. Banks, who was advancing upon Winchester from Harper's Ferry and Charlestown, had 30,000 soldiers. Gen. Jackson repeatedly offered Gen. Banks battle, but the latter declined, and on the night of the 11th of March went into camp four miles from Winchester. Gen. Jackson sent for his officers and proposed to make a night attack, but the plan was not approved by the council. He sent for the officers a second time, some hours later, and again urged them to make the night assault, but they again disapproved of the attempt. So, late in the afternoon, we withdrew from Winchester and marched to Newtown. I rode with the General as we left the place, and as we reached a high point overlooking the town,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.43 (search)
re brought in and wood needed for cooking, utensils furnished and the men were allowed all they wanted to eat. After such a long deprivation, many killed themselves from overeating. The meal was old and wormy, but it had to be eaten. Those who had survived the trying ordeal through which we passed, were taken from Hilton Head on the 5th of March, 1865, and carried to Fort Monroe on the 8th of March, after a very rough trip at sea. From there we were taken to Fort Wool, and on the 11th of March, sailed for Fort Delaware, where we landed on the 12th, next day. Of the 600 whose names were called at Johnson's Island on the 9th of February, 1864, only 293 of the number answered the call at Fort Delaware on their return after months of perils, trials, sufferings and tribulations. Fort Delaware, taken altogether, was the dirtiest, filthiest and most unhealthy prison I ever saw, and I was there three times during my captivity. The remnant of the 600 remained at Fort Delaware un