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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
troducing General Lee, and the General's address was received with enthusiastic appreciation and rapturous applause. Indeed, our whole visit to Memphis was a charming sojourn among warm-hearted friends. Arriving at Nashville on Thursday, March the 15th, we were met at the depot by General Wheless (chairman of the committee), Governor Porter, General W. H. Jackson, General B. F. Cheatham and others, were assigned elegant apartments at the Maxwell House, and during our whole stay were trendid grounds and buildings of Vanderbilt University—our drives around the beautiful city, and the thousand courtesies shown us on every side—we may not now speak. A magnificent audience greeted General Lee at Masonic theatre to-night (the 15th of March), and nowhere has his lecture been more warmly appreciated, or generously applauded. Ex-Governor Porter introduced General Lee in very fitting and appropriate style. After the lecture, there was a reception in the parlors of the Maxwell,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
troducing General Lee, and the General's address was received with enthusiastic appreciation and rapturous applause. Indeed, our whole visit to Memphis was a charming sojourn among warm-hearted friends. Arriving at Nashville on Thursday, March the 15th, we were met at the depot by General Wheless (chairman of the committee), Governor Porter, General W. H. Jackson, General B. F. Cheatham and others, were assigned elegant apartments at the Maxwell House, and during our whole stay were trendid grounds and buildings of Vanderbilt University—our drives around the beautiful city, and the thousand courtesies shown us on every side—we may not now speak. A magnificent audience greeted General Lee at Masonic theatre to-night (the 15th of March), and nowhere has his lecture been more warmly appreciated, or generously applauded. Ex-Governor Porter introduced General Lee in very fitting and appropriate style. After the lecture, there was a reception in the parlors of the Maxwell,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Diary of Rev. J. G. Law. (search)
cceeded in getting over all the wire without an accident, and after putting the car on the track we turned our faces towards Humboldt, the whistle blew, and we were off. We stopped at the farm house and enjoyed a substantial breakfast. At 2 P. M., we left Paris, and arrived at Humboldt about five o'clock, all in fine spirits, and highly pleased with our trip, notwithstanding the fact that I returned minus my boots and hat. We secured the whole of the wire from Tennessee river to Paris. March 15th.—Bethel, 12 M. We have had a hard time for the past twenty-four hours. On Thursday night we were ordered to get ready to march. At two o'clock our baggage was all on board the train, and we left at six o'clock yesterday morning, and reached here last night. The rain poured down in torrents all day and night, and the cars were so densely packed, that I was compelled to stand on the top of a box car, with no protection from the rain. I have not been in a horizontal position for two nights
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Death of General A. P. Hill. (search)
s? He said: Jenkins, take them to General Lee. Jenkins started back with his men, and we rode on. Though not invited, I was at the General's side, and my attention having now been aroused and looking carefully ahead and around I saw a lot of people in and about the old log hut winter quarters of General Mahone's division, situated to the right of Whitworth House and on top of the hill beyond the branch we were approaching. Now as I knew that those quarters had been vacant since about March 15th by the transfer of Mahone to north of the Appomattox, and feeling that it was the enemy's troops in possession, with nothing looking like a Confederate anywhere, I remarked, pointing to the old camp: General, what troops are those? He quickly replied: The enemy's. Proceeding still further and General Hill making no further remark, I became so impressed with the great risk he was running that I made bold to say: Please excuse me, General, but where are you going? He answered: Sergeant, I