Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for March 20th or search for March 20th in all documents.

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What is your rank and position in the service? Answer. Brigadier-General of volunteers; have been in command of the district of Cairo since March nineteenth, 1864. Question. What was the extent of your district when you assumed command, and what your available force? Answer. The river, from Paducah to Island Number10, inclusive, about one hundred and sixty miles, and adjacent portions of Tennessee and Kentucky. My available force for duty, as appears from tri-monthly report of March twentieth, as follows: Paducah, officers and men,408 Cairo, and men,231 Columbus, and men,998 Hickman, and men,51 Island No.10, and men,162 Union City, and men,479   Aggregate2329 Question. What was the character of your force and the condition of your command at that time? Answer. Three fourths of the men were colored, a portion of them not mustered into service, and commanded by officers temporarily assigned, awaiting commission. Of the white troops about one half at the post
March, Colonel Coburn, with one thousand eight hundred and forty-five men, attempted a reconnoissance from Franklin toward Springfield, encountering on his way Van Dorn's rebel column, estimated at seven thousand five hundred. The enemy retreated, drawing Colonel Coburn into a gorge, where he was surrounded, and nearly all his force captured. Our loss was one thousand four hundred and six. That of the enemy one hundred and fifty killed and four hundred and fifty wounded. On the twentieth of March, Colonel Hall, while on a reconnoissance, encountered and defeated the rebel General Morgan, with a force of three or four thousand. Our loss was fifty-five. The enemy left sixty-three on the field, but carried off his wounded, estimated at three hundred. On the twenty-fifth March, the rebel General Forrest made a cavalry raid on the Nashville and Columbia Railroad, burning the bridge and capturing Colonel Bloodgood's command at Brentwood. General Green Clay Smith, arriving oppor