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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 19: battle of the forts and capture of New Orleans. (search)
to be all the impediments between this and Memphis. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, D. G. Farragut, Flag-officer, Western Gulf Blockading Squadron. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. Flag-officer Farragut's detailed report of the battles of the Mississippi. United States Flag-Ship Hartford, at anchor off New Orleans, May 6, 1862. Sir — I have the honor herewith to forward my report, in detail, of the battle of New Orleans. On the 23d of March I made all my arrangements for the attack on, and passage of, Forts Jackson and St. Philip. Every vessel was as well prepared as the ingenuity of her commander and officers could suggest, both for the preservation of life and of the vessel, and, perhaps, there is not on record such a display of ingenuity as has been evinced in this little squadron. The first was by the engineer of the Richmond, Mr. Moore, by suggesting that the sheet cables be stopped up and down on the sides in the l
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., chapter 48 (search)
red; but as her cargo was English property, and was properly certified to, she was released on a ransom-bond, after the prisoners were all transferred to her. Semmes was getting merciful; the mild climate of the tropics was acting favorably upon his temperament, while his crew, for want of excitement, began to look gloomy and disconsolate. All this time Semmes made but little change in his position, lying under easy sail near the toll-gate, and allowing his prey to come to him. On the 23d of March, the Morning Star, of Boston, from Calcutta to London, and the whaling schooner, Kingfisher, of Fairhaven, Massachusetts, were captured. The fact that the cargo of the Morning Star was English saved that vessel, hut the Kingfisher was burned. Although this little vessel did not make as large a bonfire as some of her predecessors, it served tot beguile the time; and, in order to make the spectacle more interesting to his men, Semmes applied the torch at night-fall, when the effect of the
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 47: operations of South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, under Rear-admiral Dahlgren, during latter end of 1863 and in 1864. (search)
lant service. It must not be supposed that there were not constantly occurring gallant affairs on the Federal side as well as on that of the Confederates; for though the latter resorted to every means in their power to damage the Federal vessels, yet the officers of the Navy were ever on the alert to take advantage of anything that would enable them to circumvent the enemy. These were small affairs, but they were hazardous, and showed the skill of the Union officers and men. On the 23d of March, a steamer, supposed to be loading with cotton, was discovered up the Santee River, at a point called McClellansville, and Commodore Rowan, senior officer of the blockading squadron, ordered Lieutenant A. W. Weaver, of the gun-boat Winona, to fit out an expedition and cut her out. Accordingly, an expedition was started from the Winona, under the command of Acting-Master E. H. Sheffield (executive officer), consisting of the gig and second and third cutters. Acting-Ensign Lieutenant-Com