Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for March 23rd or search for March 23rd in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

adequate to the protection of your district? Answer. Wholly inadequate, considering the interests at stake, and the hostile forces within attacking distance. Question. When did you first hear that Forrest was advancing? Answer. On March twenty-third, four days after I took command, Colonel Hicks, at Paducah, and Colonel Hawkins at Union City, advised me by telegraph of the presence in their neighborhood of armed bands, both fearing an attack. At night of the same day, Colonel Hawkins to Columbus, expecting trouble there, and the next morning had them at Paducah, seventy-five miles distant, Question. Had you instructions as to the presence of that force so near you? Answer. Not specific. General Sherman, on the twenty-third of March, telegraphed that he was willing that Forrest should remain in that neighborhood if the people did not manifest friendship, and on April thirteenth he expressed a desire that Forrest should prolong his visit until certain measures could b
e's expedition. Little Rock Democrat account. little Rock, May 3, 1864. we have, heretofore, given such accounts as reached us of the movement of the army southward to cooperate with General Banks in his proposed expedition against Shreveport. We present, to-day, a succinct statement, which we have collected from all the statements of the operations of the gallant little army of General Steele, from the day he left here. The advanced-guard moved from Little Rock on the twenty-third of March, on the military road. On the twenty-fourth, the whole command moved, the head of the column resting that night on the Saline, beyond Benton. On the twenty-fifth, the command crossed Saline bottom, and on the succeeding day reached Rockport. On the twenty-seventh, a bridge was thrown across the Ouachita River and the troops crossed and moved in the direction of Arkadelphia. That night there was a heavy rain-storm, and the army encamped at Bayou Roche on the night of the twenty-ei