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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 1: re-formation and Reanimation.—1841. (search)
h two visits to Ireland, the publication of a controversial pamphlet, Right and Wrong among the Abolitionists of the United States: or, the Objects, Principles, and Measures of the Original American A. S. Society Unchanged. By John A. Collins, Representative of the A. A. S. S. Glasgow: Geo. Gallie, 1841 (Lib. 11: 77, 138). This was begun, with the aid of Elizabeth Pease, in the latter part of January, and was out by the third week in March (Mss. Feb. 2, 1841, E. Pease to W. L. G., and Mar. 24, to Collins). and the confirmation of the Scotch alliance with the old organization, summer overtook him before he felt free to rejoin his associates in America. He crossed in the same steamer with the Phillipses, arriving July 4, 1841. July 17, 1841, ten days after the Chapmans had returned Lib. 11.119 III. from Hayti. They had embarked for the island on Dec. 28, 1840 (Lib. 11: 3), for the sake of Mr. Henry G. Chapman's health, which was only temporarily benefited. Great was the rej
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 8: the Anti-Sabbath Convention.—1848. (search)
ty obstacle in the way of all the reforms of the age,—such as Anti-Slavery, Peace, Temperance, Purity, Human Brotherhood, etc., etc.,—and rendered adamantine in its aspect towards bleeding Humanity, whose cause must not be pleaded but whose cries must be stifled on its sacred occurrence; . . . We, the undersigned, therefore, invite all who agree with us essentially in these views of the Sabbath question, to meet in Convention, in the city of Boston, on Thursday and Friday, the 23d and 24th of March next, to confer together, and to decide upon such measures for the dissemination of light and knowledge, on this subject, as may be deemed expedient. In publishing this call for an Anti-Sabbath Convention, we desire to be clearly understood. We have no objection either to the first or the seventh day of the week as a day of rest from bodily toil, both for man and beast. On the contrary, such rest is not only desirable but indispensable. Neither man nor beast can long endure unmitiga
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 15: the Personal Liberty Law.—1855. (search)
n. The common cry is, We want no slavery and no niggers. . . . I am much disappointed in the character of the New England emigrants. They come here, as men go to California, mainly after money. The siege of Lawrence, and the sight of a free-State man wantonly murdered in this exciting period, caused Mr. Lib. 26.2. Stearns formally to renounce his non-resistance views, and to shoulder his Sharp's rifle against wild beasts (not men). Mr. Garrison still held to the faith. He presided on March 24, 25, at a New England Non-Resistance Convention held Lib. 25.50, 60. in Worcester, By way of record, let us state here that the New England Non-Resistance Society held its last annual meetings and ceased to exist in 1849 (Lib. 19: 2, 3, 174, 186). On Jan. 1, 1848, Adin Ballou's paper had been made the organ of the Society, under the title of the Non-Resistant and Practical Christian (Lib. 18: 14). The compound name and the organship lasted only a year (Lib. 19: 14). and drew up a long a