Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for March 28th or search for March 28th in all documents.

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March 28. Governor Pickens, of South Carolina, sent a message to the convention of that State, informing it that six hundred men would be required to garrison the forts in Charleston harbor; besides giving other important details respecting the financial condition of the State. This message is printed complete in the New York Tribune of April 2, 1861. The actual vote of the State of Louisiana on secession is given by the New Orleans papers of to-day as follows: For secession, 20,--448; against it, 17,296.--World, April 4.
in the harbor of Beaufort, N. C., for some time, was set on fire by the rebels, and completely destroyed. The Nashville (Tenn.) Times suspended publication, owing to the restriction of its independence by Gov. Andrew Johnson.--N. Y. Times, March 28. Gen. Wright, Commander of the Department of the Pacific, instituted martial law in San Francisco, and issued an order dated February second, by which Major Hiram Leonard, of the United States Army, is appointed Provost-Marshal.--N. Y. Herar of Beaufort, N. C., for some time, was set on fire by the rebels, and completely destroyed. The Nashville (Tenn.) Times suspended publication, owing to the restriction of its independence by Gov. Andrew Johnson.--N. Y. Times, March 28. Gen. Wright, Commander of the Department of the Pacific, instituted martial law in San Francisco, and issued an order dated February second, by which Major Hiram Leonard, of the United States Army, is appointed Provost-Marshal.--N. Y. Herald, March 28.
the merits of the bill then ensued, which was continued until the adjournment. An engagement occurred between the gun-boats Tyler and Lexington and a masked battery in the vicinity of Eastport, Tenn. The gunboats fired fifty shots. The Tyler's smoke-stack was struck once. The effect on the enemy's works was not ascertained.--N. Y. Commercial, March 29. This morning two boats' crews from the United States steamer Yankee landed at Shipping Point, Va., to remove the guns left by the rebels, but while so engaged a body of rebel cavalry, said to be the Dumfries cavalry, numbering one thousand five hundred men, made their appearance on the hill, and the men pulled off, after securing two guns, one a nine-inch Dahlgren and the other a long thirty-two-pounder, both smooth-bore, which were found to be double-shotted. The Yankee fell out into the stream, on the appearance of the enemy, and turned her guns upon them, but they retired and kept out of range.--Washington Star, March 28.
he manner in which the war was conducted. At this the crowd began to hiss him, and storm him with rotten eggs. The ladies in the audience got frightened at these proceedings, and the excitement of the crowd rose to fever-heat, and there were angry cries of Kill him, Tar and feather him, etc. The Mayor of the city was present, and tried to stop the excitement, but did not succeed in doing so. Finally the gentleman withdrew and was taken away from the hall by his friends.--N. Y. Commercial, March 28. The Petersburgh Express of this date, says that wood has become as scarce in that city as good coffee, and appeals to the farmers and railroads to relieve the distress. Brooms are pronounced a luxury, and the growing of broom-corn is earnestly recommended. So scarce has leather become, that hickory splits are recommended as a substitute in harnesses. In view of the scarcity of lead, merchants and others having old teachests, are recommended to bring them out for the lead they conta
March 28. This day Morgan's rebel cavalry captured a train on the Louisville and Nashville Railroad. Col. Curran Pope, of Kentucky, was taken prisoner, with a few other Union officers. The locomotive was run into a ditch and the cars destroyed. A fight took place this day at Apache Canon, eighty miles from Union and twenty miles from Santa Fe, New Mexico, between the Nationals under Major Chivington, Capts. Lewis and Wynkoop, and a party of Texans. Three battalions advanced to the caƱon when the pickets reported no enemy in sight. The command then advanced, when shots were fired at them by the Texans, who were in ambush, and succeeded in killing four privates. The Unionists under Slough, rushed on them, killing twenty or thirty Texans, wounding many of them, and taking seven prisoners, four officers, and three privates. Major Chivington's command went ahead and surprised the Texan pickets, taking sixty-seven prisoners and sixty-four provision-wagons. A plan of action
March 28. The Legislature of Massachusetts adopted unanimously a resolution tendering to the soldiers of that State the thanks of the Commonwealth for the services they had rendered in the war for the restoration of the Union, and pledging such reenforcements to their support as the National authority should from time to time demand.--The National gunboat Diana, was this day captured by the rebels near Pattersonville, La.--(Doc. 149.) This morning Coles's Island, nine miles from Charleston, S. C., was taken possession of by the One Hundredth New York volunteers, under the command of Colonel George F. B. Dandy.--(Doc. 150.) The rebels burned the temporary bridge with which the National forces had replaced the Stone Bridge at Bull Run, Va. They also were engaged in collecting all the grain and other supplies they could obtain in Loudon and Fauquier counties in that State. The steamer Sam Gaty was stopped and boarded at Sibley, Mo., by a gang of rebel guerrillas who
March 28. A riot occurred .at Charleston, Illinois, in which several persons were killed and wounded.--(Doc. 136.) The election, ordered by Major-General Banks, for delegates to the Constitutional Convention of Louisiana, was held, and resulted in the success of the Free State party. Two rebel spies were captured in the navy-yard at Mound City, Arkansas, this morning.--an express train, which left Louisville, Ky., this morning, for Lebanon, was captured by a body of guerrillas, and two of the cars were burned. A guard of seventeen National soldiers on the train surrendered without firing a gun.