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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Closing operations in the Gulf and western rivers. (search)
aptured. The surrender of Commodore Farrand and the naval forces under his command to Admiral Thatcher was agreed upon at Citronelle on May 4th, at the same time as the surrender of Taylor to Canby. The formal surrender, in accordance with the agreement, was made to Fleet-Captain Edward Simpson, on May 10th, at Nanna Hubba Bluff, on the Tombigbee. It included four vessels, 112 officers, 285 enlisted men, and 24 marines. The loss of vessels during the campaign was unusually large. On March 28th the Milwaukee, Lieutenant-Commander James H. Gillis, returning to the fleet from an attack on a transport lying near Spanish Fort, exploded a torpedo, and sank in three minutes. Next day the Osage struck a torpedo under her bow and went down almost immediately. A similar accident resulted in the loss of the tin-clad Rodolph on April 1st. A fortnight later, immediately after the surrender of Mobile, the gun-boat Sciota was lost in the same way, as were also the tugs Ida and Althea, and a
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the Appomattox campaign. (search)
them on the west and north-west. A walk of half an hour would bring them to ground that neither their officers nor ours would pass over during their brief stay in the vicinity. At the end of February, 1865 (according to the inspection reports), the Army of Northern Virginia had 3005 officers and 43,052 men of infantry and cavalry present effective for the field. The artillery at this time probably numbered 5000, Custis Lee's division in the defenses of Richmond 3000, and Rosser's cavalry (which joined in March) 2000. After making due allowance for losses at Fort Stedman and along the lines up to March 28th, the effective strength of Lee's army at the beginning of the campaign is estimated as follows: cavalry, 5000; artillery, 5000; infantry, 44,000 = 54,000. This does not include local troops and naval forces, of which no data are obtainable. Graves of Union soldiers at City Point. From a War-time photograph. View of Goldsboro‘, North Carolina. From a War-time sketch.