Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4. You can also browse the collection for March 28th or search for March 28th in all documents.

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 50: last months of the Civil War.—Chase and Taney, chief-justices.—the first colored attorney in the supreme court —reciprocity with Canada.—the New Jersey monopoly.— retaliation in war.—reconstruction.—debate on Louisiana.—Lincoln and Sumner.—visit to Richmond.—the president's death by assassination.—Sumner's eulogy upon him. —President Johnson; his method of reconstruction.—Sumner's protests against race distinctions.—death of friends. —French visitors and correspondents.—1864-1865. (search)
p. 238-242. The Evening Post, March 1, 1866, contains a rather cynical notice of Sumner's speech of February 5 and 6, 1866. While retaining its Republican connection, it regarded (November 6, 7, and 8, 1867) the reconstruction measures of Congress, except the fourteenth amendment, as needless, violent, unstatesmanlike, and fanatical. The New York Times, in successive leaders, took positive ground against negro suffrage as any part of the reconstruction. March 2; June 3, 19, 21, 23, 24, 26, 28, 29. The Cincinnati Commercial printed eleven years later letters found in Andrew Johnson's office at Greenville, Tenn., after his death, which approved his policy of reconstruction at the outset. Among them were letters and telegrams from George Bancroft, James Gordon Bennett, Henry J. Raymond, Simon Cameron, and W. H. Seward. Charles A. Dana, then an editor in Chicago, wrote to Sumner that it was advisable to keep with the President as far as possible in order to prevent the Democrats comi
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, chapter 10 (search)
gencies of your case. Come and make yourself at it home with me. I have seen Mr. Seward who is anxious as ever that you should carry on the proposed compilation. Sumner had, after consultation with Seward, called in the Senate for the correspondence with Great Britain concerning the recognition of rebel belligerency and depredations by the Alabama and other cruisers fitted out in that country. Both Seward and Sumner were desirous that Mr. Bemis should arrange the papers. To Lieber, March 28:— I think you will like the German treaty. To my mind it is essentially just. Concerning naturalized citizens emigrating from Germany. It embodies the claim originally made by Cass, and for a long time denied by Prussia. His claim represented high-water mark on this question in our country, and now Germany reaches this point. The treaty was carried, after debate, by thirty-nine to eight. The House passed at this session a bill concerning the rights of naturalized citizens.
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 55: Fessenden's death.—the public debt.—reduction of postage.— Mrs. Lincoln's pension.—end of reconstruction.—race discriminations in naturalization.—the Chinese.—the senator's record.—the Cuban Civil War.—annexation of San Domingo.—the treaties.—their use of the navy.—interview with the presedent.—opposition to the annexation; its defeat.—Mr. Fish.—removal of Motley.—lecture on Franco-Prussian War.—1869-1870. (search)
nt against you, and therefore the pretence that he was influenced by any such cause to remove Motley must be groundless. Stewart—a supporter of the treaty, devoted to the President but not friendly to Sumner —told Forney that the speech was magnificent The main points of the speech as given by correspondents were as follows: New York Herald, March 25. 26, 28, 31. New York Times, March 25. New York Tribune, March 25. New York World, March 25. Boston Advertiser, March 26. Boston Journal, March 28. Chicago Republican, March 25. The correspondent of the New York Times, March 14, stated the senator's expected opposition to the annexation on grounds like those he took in the debate.. 1. The proposed annexation likely to encourage further acquisitions in the same direction, bringing to the United States a population difficult to assimilate, involving large expense and complications with other powers, particularly with Hayti, which asserted claims against San Domingo. 2. The half islan
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 56: San Domingo again.—the senator's first speech.—return of the angina pectoris.—Fish's insult in the Motley Papers.— the senator's removal from the foreign relations committee.—pretexts for the remioval.—second speech against the San Domingo scheme.—the treaty of Washington.—Sumner and Wilson against Butler for governor.—1870-1871. (search)
New York Tribune, March 31; New York Herald, March 28; New York Sun, March 28; Washington Patriot, March 28; Washington Patriot, March 28; Boston Journal, March 28; Boston Advertiser, March 28; New York Independent, April 6; LondMarch 28; Boston Journal, March 28; Boston Advertiser, March 28; New York Independent, April 6; London Telegraph, April 12. As no morning business was on hand, Sumner's elaborate and comprehensive resMarch 28; Boston Advertiser, March 28; New York Independent, April 6; London Telegraph, April 12. As no morning business was on hand, Sumner's elaborate and comprehensive resolutions, which summarized his views, were first read, and he then took the floor, using printed sliMarch 28; New York Independent, April 6; London Telegraph, April 12. As no morning business was on hand, Sumner's elaborate and comprehensive resolutions, which summarized his views, were first read, and he then took the floor, using printed slips, and speaking three and a half hours. His manner throughout was solemn and earnest; but emotion, g Post, Chicago Tribune, and New York Herald, March 28, approved the speech, particularly in its timl except in its last passage (Boston Journal, March 28 and 29). One passage near the end was not in rced apology and silence. New York Herald, March 28; Brooklyn Union, March 28; Boston Advertiser,March 28; Boston Advertiser, March 28. The San Domingo senators arranged at first that the speech should be received withoutMarch 28. The San Domingo senators arranged at first that the speech should be received without reply, but they did not adhere to this understanding. Morton commented on its untimeliness, coming[1 more...]
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 57: attempts to reconcile the President and the senator.—ineligibility of the President for a second term.—the Civil-rights Bill.—sale of arms to France.—the liberal Republican party: Horace Greeley its candidate adopted by the Democrats.—Sumner's reserve.—his relations with Republican friends and his colleague.—speech against the President.—support of Greeley.—last journey to Europe.—a meeting with Motley.—a night with John Bright.—the President's re-election.—1871-1872. (search)
A. Wells, Hiram Barney, George Wilkes, and J. R. Doolittle; and they were reinforced by others who joined in a similar pressure at Washington. They set forth with great urgency the necessity of his taking a stand openly in order to save the new movement at its birth; and they added the personal appeal that one of its inspirations was the indignation felt at the outrage inflicted on him by the President and his partisans in his removal from his committee. Mr. Reid wrote with much concern, March 28, on belalf of himself and Mr. Greeley, as to conflicting reports concerning the senator's position, and pleaded against further delay, saying:— It is needful that you should know at once the grave anxiety that has been inspired, and the light in which Mr. Greeley would regard any prolonged delay in an authoritative expression from you with reference to the combination against Grant. When urging me to go over and see you, he asked me to say that in case you were not going to support u