hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 237 237 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 96 96 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 32 32 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 20 20 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 16 16 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Irene E. Jerome., In a fair country 16 16 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 15 15 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 14 14 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 14 14 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 14 14 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War. You can also browse the collection for April or search for April in all documents.

Your search returned 13 results in 8 document sections:

General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 1 (search)
lecting the points to be occupied by these troops for the protection of the State, and determining the number to be assigned to each. Norfolk, a point near Yorktown, another in front of Fredericksburg, Manassas Junction, Harper's Ferry, and Grafton, seemed to be regarded by him as the most important positions, for they were to be occupied in greatest force. I was assisted in my duties by Lieutenant-Colonel Pemberton, Majors Jackson and Gilham, and Captain T. L. Preston. Near the end of April, however, the second named was promoted to a colonelcy and assigned to the command of Harper's Ferry, held until then by Colonel Kenton Harper. I was employed in this way about two weeks. Then, Virginia having acceded to the Southern Confederacy, the government of which assumed the direction of military affairs, I accepted a brigadier-generalcy offered me by telegraph by the President. It was then the highest grade in the Confederate army. The offer had been made in one or two previou
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 6 (search)
were nine gun-boats, of the two Federal fleets, between Port Hudson and Vicksburg. In consequence of this information, the two brigades of infantry, under General Buford, on the way from Mississippi to Tennessee, were ordered to return. The only activity apparent in either of the principal armies, before the end of March, was exhibited by that of General Grant, in its efforts to open a way by water around Vicksburg, to some point on the river, below the town. But in the beginning of April this enterprise was abandoned, and General Grant decided that his troops should march to a point selected, on the west bank of the Mississippi, and that the vessels-of-war and transports should run down to that point, passing the Confederate batteries at night. McClernand's corps (Thirteenth) led in the march, followed, at some distance, by McPherson's (Seventeenth). About the middle of the month a Federal detachment of five regiments of cavalry, and two of infantry, with two field-batt
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 7 (search)
ary value of Vicksburg, expressed five or six weeks earlier, might not have seemed unreasonable; for then the commanders of the United States squadrons believed, apparently, that its batteries were too formidable to be passed by their vessels-of-war. But, when Lieutenant-General Pemberton wrote the letter quoted from, those batteries had been proved to be ineffective, for Admiral Porter's squadron had passed them, and in that way had made the severance of the Confederacy, before the end of April, that General Pemberton apprehended would be permitted, if he obeyed my order, to save his army by withdrawing it to the northeast, on the 18th of May. In my reply to this letter, dispatched promptly, I said: I am trying to gather a force which may attempt to relieve you. Hold out. On the same day instructions were sent to Major-General Gardner, both by telegraph and by courier, to evacuate Port Hudson, and march toward Jackson. After General Pemberton's investment in Vicksburg, t
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 7 (search)
troops were required to repel raids in Northern Mississippi. Indeed, General Pemberton's whole correspondence with me in April indicated that he was much more apprehensive of predatory incursions, than of the formidable invasion preparing under his-the river had been captured by the Federal fleets, and the severance of the Confederacy accomplished. Before the end of April the portion of the river between Vicksburg and Port Hudson was more strongly held by the Federal vessels-of-war than any by leading it away. If I and the reinforcements sent from Beauregard's department had been ordered to Mississippi in April, in time to join General Pemberton's army, I could have directed the Confederate forces, and would have been responsible to Pemberton. But my sending back the division of infantry, employing a division of Bragg's cavalry to aid Pemberton in April, transferring a large brigade of cavalry into Mississippi on the 5th of May, and applying for reinforcements for Pemberto
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 9 (search)
from Mississippi, Quarles's and Baldwin's brigades, sent back to Mississippi by the President two weeks after. and the cavalry sent back by Longstreet, No cavalry had been sent back by Longstreet; Martin's division, referred to, rejoined us in April following. would furnish a force exceeding in number that actually engaged in any battle, on the Confederate side, during the present war. To disprove this assertion, it is not necessary to go back to the previous years of the war, and the grer Colonel Hannon, was retained by me, and served with the army in the campaign of that year. The time of winter was employed mainly in improving the discipline and instruction of the troops, and attention to their comfort. Before the end of April, more than five thousand absentees had been brought back to their regiments. The establishment of a system which allowed furloughs to all the men in turn, it was thought, contributed greatly to this result. Military operations were confined gen
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 12 (search)
navy, and such articles would have been very valuable in the military hospitals, I suggested to the Government their transfer to the army. The Administration, however, thought it necessary to keep them where they were. Soon after the middle of April they were scattered by men of the Virginia army, joined by citizens, but not before the naval officer in command had transferred all that he could control to the military hospital department. I was equally unsuccessful in an application to tther journey. Before the Confederate army came to Greensboroa, much of the provisions in depot there had been consumed or wasted by fugitives from the Army of Virginia; still, enough was left for the subsistence of the troops until the end of April. In making the last agreement with General Sherman, I relied upon the depots recently established in South Carolina, for the subsistence of the troops on the way to their homes. A few days before they marched, however, Colonel Moore informed m
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 14 (search)
heir confidence in the Government, as well as that of the people of the State, was weakened by the disasters at Baker's Creek and the Big Black, the loss of Vicksburg, and capture of its brave garrison. These disasters were caused by the hesitation of the Government to reinforce the Army of the Mississippi. About eighteen thousand men were sent to it from Beauregard's and Bragg's departments between the 12th and the end of May. This could have been done as easily between the middle of April, when General Grant's plan became distinctly known, and the 1st of May, when he crossed the Mississippi. With such an addition to his strength, General Pemberton would certainly have enabled Bowen to meet McClernand's corps, near Bruinsburg, with a superior force, and probably decide the campaign by defeating it. The only proper measures in my power were taken to rebuild the railroad and bridge at Jackson, after their destruction by the Federal army in July. As many laborers, wagons, a
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Letters. (search)
ay 2, 1863. If Grant crosses, unite your whole force to beat him. Success will give back what was abandoned to win it. The question of supplies, and the necessity of a sufficient cavalry force (without which I was powerless) to protect my communications, in event of a movement south of Big Black, toward Bayou Pierre, has been sufficiently referred to in the body of my report. I have one more remark to make in reference to cavalry. General Johnston informed me, about the middle of April, that he had ordered a brigade to my assistance. So far as my knowledge extends, it did not enter the limits of my department; for a few days subsequently General Johnston notified me that a strong force of the enemy in front of Roddy prevented his leaving Northern Alabama at that time, and requested me, if possible, to send a force to cooperate with him. To this I replied, under date of April 20th, from Jackson, reminding him that I had but a feeble cavalry force, but that I would certainl