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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 237 237 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 96 96 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 32 32 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 20 20 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 16 16 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Irene E. Jerome., In a fair country 16 16 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 15 15 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 14 14 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 14 14 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 14 14 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for April or search for April in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 2 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Jackson's Valley campaign of 1862. (search)
New officers were to be elected. The ranks were filling up under the impetus given to volunteering by the conscription bill. The weather during the first half of April was very raw and cold, and during the whole month was exceedingly rainy. All these causes rendered quiet very acceptable to the Confederates. Nor was the enemyed Harrisonburg on the 6th of June, Jackson left it. Instead of taking the road via Conrad's store to Swift Run Gap, as he had done when retreating before Banks in April, he now took the road to Port Republic, where the branches of the main Shenandoah unite. He next sent a party to burn the bridge at Conrad's store, which affordedas to effectually check his further progress. Here he gains ten days time for the reorganization of his regiments (the time of service of most of which expired in April), and here, too, the return of furloughed men and the accession of volunteers nearly doubles his numbers. Finding that no more troops could be obtained beside t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Beauregard's and Hampton's orders on Evacuating Columbia — letter from Colonel A. R. Chisolm. (search)
Beauregard's and Hampton's orders on Evacuating Columbia — letter from Colonel A. R. Chisolm. [The following letter from a gallant officer of General Beauregard's staff seems to settle beyond question the character of the orders given when the Confederates evacuated Columbia.] New York, March 23, 1879. Rev. J. William Jones, D. D., Secretary Southern Historical Society, Richmond, Va.: My Dear Sir — I have read in the April number of the Society Papers Colonel James Wood Davidson's communication relative to the burning of Columbia by General Sherman, and it may be a matter of interest in future that I inform you of what took place between Generals Beauregard and Hampton on the evening previous to the evacuation of that city. As Aid-de-Camp to General Beauregard I was the only officer present with the two Generals. Beauregard had arrived late in the day from Charleston. Late in the evening Hampton called on him at the hotel, and after stating the condition of affairs in