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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 237 237 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 96 96 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 32 32 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 20 20 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 16 16 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Irene E. Jerome., In a fair country 16 16 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 15 15 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 14 14 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 14 14 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 14 14 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for April or search for April in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the army of Northern Virginia, or the boys in gray, as I saw them from Harper's Ferry in 1861 to Appomattox Court-house in 1865. (search)
professor in Lexington. But Governor Letcher knew the story of his brilliant career in Mexico, and had faith in his soldierly qualities. When his name was presented to the Virginia Convention for confirmation a member rose and asked who is this Major Jackson? and the delegate from Rockbridge replied, He is a man of whom you may be certain that if you tell him to hold a position he will never leave it alive. I remember that we, too, asked when he first got to Harper's Ferry, the last of April; Who is Colonel Jackson? but during the month he held the command he showed so clearly that he knew just what he was about that we were almost sorry when we first heard, the last of May, that the command had been turned over to that great strategist, General J. E. Johnston. Frequent guard and picket duty, almost constant drilling (I remember one Sunday I had made two appointments to preach, but was on drill seven hours during the day, and was sent on picket that night), and the routine o
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The attempt to Fasten the assassination of President Lincoln on President Davis and other innocent parties. (search)
the man mad? Is he a fool? and declined any communication with him. Again. See page 4, speaking of John H. Surratt. Q.--You say you saw him in Montreal in April, last? A.--Yes, sir. Q.--About what time in April was it? A.--It was within a week before the President's assassination. I think about the 6th and 7th of AprApril was it? A.--It was within a week before the President's assassination. I think about the 6th and 7th of April--somewhere in that vicinity. Q.--You say you saw him in Thompson's room? A.--I saw him in Mr. Thompson's room. Q.--State whether he gave any communication to Thompson in your presence in his room, and what that communication was. A.--There was a conversation there at that time, from which it appeared that Mr. Surratt hadwhether you have stated precisely. If you have not done it, I wish you would now, who were present at this conversation which you had with Jacob Thompson early in April, when he laid his hand on the dispatches. A.--Mr. Surratt, General Carroll and myself. Q.--Can you state whether any of these persons participated in the conve
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The campaign of Chancellorsville — by Theodore A. Dodge, United States army. (search)
f the Confederate army. He had then attempted to carry Lee's lines in his front by main force, and had met with disastrous repulse. But it was easy to turn the Confederate position by crossing above or below it, thus forcing Lee to a battle outside of his lines, or to a retreat, to cover his communications. Hooker decided to turn the Confederate left flank by crossing the Rapidan and Rappahannock above their junction. He first sent forward his splendid body of cavalry about the middle of April, intending that they should cross in advance of the infantry, and, sweeping round to the Confederate rear, do all the damage possible to Lee's depots, and the railroads on which he depended for supplies. Stoneman, with the cavalry, reached the Upper Rappahannock, met with a rain-storm, and some opposition from the Confederates, and then went deliberately into camp near the Rappahannock, and along the Orange and Alexandria railroad. The river was past fording for some time, and Stoneman was
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The work of the Southern Historical Society in Europe. (search)
f doing so. The following private letter from our gallant friend, Major I. Scheibert, was not intended for publication, but it is so interesting as illustrating the point to which we have referred, that we take the liberty of Publishing it, and beg that our friend will excuse us: Hirschberg Prussia, 13th October, 1881. Rev. J. Wm. Jones: my Dear Sir,--I hope you have not forgotten your old Southern friend; but I have not received the Southern Historical Papers since the month of April. You know how deeply I am interested in your Papers, and how I appreciate the valuable military study they afford me. I am proud to say that the combined efforts of Heros Von Borcke and myself have brought it about that in the German-Prussian army nothing concerning the civil war in America is so in fashion as accounts of the deeds of Southrons. Sherman and Grant, the pets of ten years ago, are forgotten, and Lee, Jackson and Stuart are now the favorite heroes of our officers. Your