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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 237 237 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 96 96 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 32 32 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 20 20 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 16 16 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Irene E. Jerome., In a fair country 16 16 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 15 15 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 14 14 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 14 14 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 14 14 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for April or search for April in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 6 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
communication from Mr. G. W. J. DeRenne was submitted by the President and ordered to be read: Savannah, May 21, 1879. The President of the Ladies' Memorial Association, Savannah. Madam,—In pursuance of the proposition made and accepted in April of last year, I now present to the Ladies' Memorial Association a bronze statue of a Confederate soldier. It represents him as he was, marked with the marks of service in features, form and raiment; a man who chose rather to be than to seem, t his Missourians to carry it out. The General again refused to strike a blow, preferring the easier generalship of retreating; stating as his reason, however, that he did not know where the enemy was. The first time I ever saw Vicksburg was in April before the siege. As the engineer officer in charge of the fortification at Snyder's and Hayne's bluffs, I had been making requisitions on Mobile and other points through Generals Lee and Stevenson, for materials to secure the immense raft cons
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of Dr. G. W. Derenne. (search)
ceptance of that noble gift: A meeting of the Ladies' Memorial Association was held June 3rd, 1879, at 6 o'clock, at the lecture room of the Independent Presbyterian Church, when, after the transaction of the usual routine business, the following communication from Mr. G. W. J. DeRenne was submitted by the President and ordered to be read: Savannah, May 21, 1879. The President of the Ladies' Memorial Association, Savannah. Madam,—In pursuance of the proposition made and accepted in April of last year, I now present to the Ladies' Memorial Association a bronze statue of a Confederate soldier. It represents him as he was, marked with the marks of service in features, form and raiment; a man who chose rather to be than to seem, to bear hardship than to complain of it; a man who met with unflinching firmness the fate decreed him, to suffer, to fight, and to die in vain. I offer the statue as a tribute to the men of the Confederate army. Without name or fame, or hope of ga
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the siege of Vicksburg. (search)
ke any serious demonstration on his front, owing to Grant's communication with his base of supplies being destroyed by the writer of this burning a mile of railroad trestle-work. General Price respectfully suggested a certain movement, asking only his Missourians to carry it out. The General again refused to strike a blow, preferring the easier generalship of retreating; stating as his reason, however, that he did not know where the enemy was. The first time I ever saw Vicksburg was in April before the siege. As the engineer officer in charge of the fortification at Snyder's and Hayne's bluffs, I had been making requisitions on Mobile and other points through Generals Lee and Stevenson, for materials to secure the immense raft constructed across the Yazoo river, opposite the seige guns of Snyder's Bluff. The raft was about to give way from the pressures of at least 6,000 tons of drift wood accumulated on its upper side. In my anxiety to secure the raft I resolved upon a pers
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
eting and the hearty cooperation of our friends there. A gallant and accomplished soldier, a graceful and eloquent speaker, a genial and popular gentleman, and an enthusiast in his work, General Johnston never fails to make friends for the Society wherever he goes. We hope to be able before long to announce for him a programme which will go far towards ensuring the success of our effort for permanent endowment. A Confederate soldiers' home for Louisiana was organized in New Orleans in April last, and our friend, Private John H. Murray, advised us that he had sent us an account of its organization; but we regret to say that the paper containing it somehow miscarried, and we must ask for a brief sketch of it for future publication. Valentine's Recumbent figure of Lee will be unveiled at Lexington, Va., on the 28th of June, with appropriate ceremonies, a full account of which we hope to give in our next. Meantime we cordially congratulate the Lee Memorial Association on the co
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of the Lee Memorial Association. (search)
has a pleasant studio on Leigh street, one of the quietest, shadiest portions of the shady city of Richmond. It is fitted with that bric-a-brac so dear to the artist's soul—old tapestries, articles of vertu, statuettes by Flamingo, figures found in Pompeii, curios from Egypt, his master Kiss's works, copies from the old galleries of Florence and Rome, and such like matters—not to speak of the sculptor's own varied creations, which, of course, give it its special attraction and value. The April number of the Southern Review, in an article entitled Art in the South, thus speaks of Mr. Valentine: Valentine, of Virginia, is one of the foremost of American sculptors, * * * and were his studio in Rome, or London, or Boston, or New York, is it too much to say that his hands would be filled with commissions? Is it beyond the truth to aver that his pathetic and exquisite Andromache and Astyanax would have been gracing in marble some princely saloon, instead of having to wait in the moulde
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The friendship between Lee and Scott. (search)
upted, I shall return to my native State and share the miseries of my people, and save in defense will draw my sword on none. Three weeks after this was written he received orders to report to the Commander-in-Chief at Washington, and hastening to obey the summons, reached there on the 1st of March, just three days before the inauguration of President Lincoln. His hopes for the averting of civil war were doomed to a sad disappointment, and events followed so rapidly that by the middle of April he was compelled to decide whether he would go with the North or with Virginia in the great struggle—whether he would accept the command of the United States armies in the field or share the miseries of his people, while he gave up place, fortune and his beautiful home at Arlington to serve his native Virginia. If any influence could have swerved Lee from his purpose, it was his friendship for his commander and his high respect for his opinions. General Scott used all of his powers of pers