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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 237 237 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 96 96 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 32 32 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 20 20 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 16 16 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Irene E. Jerome., In a fair country 16 16 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 15 15 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 14 14 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 14 14 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 14 14 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for April or search for April in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The natal day of General Robert Edward Lee (search)
this report in as brief and concise a form as possible to show how nearly this Chapter for the last twelve months has served the purpose for which it was organized. The initial work of the year was the provision made at the first regular meeting for the entertainment of the State Convention held in this city on March I to 3. Fifty-five dollars was appropriated towards an entertainment for this Convention. This Chapter was well represented in the woman's department at the State Fair in April last. Representatives of this Chapter assisted in a reception at the St. Charles Hotel, given by the U. C. V. of this city, in honor of the State sponsor and her maids of honor. This chapter was hostess at the presentation ceremonies at Memorial Hall, at which was donated the portrait of General Randall Lee Gibson. By resolution this chapter contributes one dollar a month to the infirmary at the Soldiers' Home, and in addition had constituted a special committee whose duty it is to
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Thomas R. R. Cobb. (search)
ssissippi delegation are wax in his hands. I am much afraid of the result. I struggled hard this morning to place in the Constitution a provision which would stop Sunday mails but failed. His work in the Presidential Congress having been concluded, Mr. Cobb returned to his home in Athens, Georgia. The capture of Fort Sumter, the wild excitement which followed the organization of volunteers and preparations for war filled the interval until the re-assembling of Congress at Montgomery in April. Montgomery, April 19, 1861.—The atmosphere of this place is positively tainted with selfish ambitious schemes for personal aggrandisement. I see it, hear it, feel it, and am disgusted with it. But I would rather tell you of my journey here. At Maxey's, George Lumpkin's company was drawn up, and would have a speech from me. At Union Point we met the Young Guards, and again I had to make a little speech. At Greensboro Oscar Dawson told me he had raised in two days a company of eighty m
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Gen. P. G. T. Beauregard. (search)
ive quiet, had closed, and the Federals and Confederates were concentrating and marshalling their forces for a more vigorous and decisive campaign than had yet marked the history of the war. Virginia and Tennessee were respectively in the East and West, the theatres upon which the opposing banners were unfurled, and it was evident that around these two centres would be collected in hostile array all the strength that either party possessed. Gilmore, with the bulk of his army, had early in April been transferred from South Carolina to Virginia. Beauregard had been assigned to the department of North Carolina and Southern Virginia —a territorial command which was made to extend from Wilmington to Richmond. Of the infantry under his command at Charleston, Wise's and Walker's Brigades followed him; soon after Hagood's Brigade, and a week later Colquitt's. Hagood's Brigade was concentrated at Wilmington by the 4th of May, whence it was directed to report by letter to General Beauregar
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Crenshaw Battery, Pegram's Battalion, Confederate States Artillery. (search)
e Army of the Potomac, as it was then known, and having started Avarill on a raid as a preliminary step to his onward march to Richmond, we were ordered hurriedly to leave our quarters and start again to the front to meet the same old enemy. The April sun had dried the roads and we soon found ourselves once more in front of Fredericksburg, Hooker opposing us with an army about four times the size of ours, Longstreet being then on the Blackwater near Suffolk, having spent the winter there. Andfield. Look with me, my comrades, as I attempt to picture to you this beautiful field, the foliage of which was now bursting out in all its glory, all nature bearing testimony to the goodness of Him that causeth the earth to praise Him, as the April sun, now in all its resplendent glory, is attuned in attestation of its loveliness, now so peaceful yet soon to be the seat of carnage. Standing in line the eye is first attracted by a neat frame-house, situated in the right corner of the fiel