hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 237 237 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 96 96 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 32 32 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 20 20 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 16 16 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Irene E. Jerome., In a fair country 16 16 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 15 15 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 14 14 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 14 14 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 14 14 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for April or search for April in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The ironclad ram Virginia-Confederate States Navy, [from the Richmond, Va., News-leader, April 1, 1904.] (search)
y several times. No one was killed or wounded in the fight with the Monitor. The only damage done by the Monitor was to the armor, the effect of shot striking obliquely on the shield, breaking the iron and sometimes displacing several feet of the outside courses and the wooden backing inside. After being repaired at the Gosport navy-yard and having the disabled guns replaced, under the supervision of Commodore Josiah Tatnall, the Virginia steamed down Hampton Roads about the middle of April, expecting to have another fight with the Monitor. But there was no fight. The Monitor hugged the other shore under the protection of the guns of Fort Monroe. Our commander tried several times to persuade the vessel to come out and fight, but she never came. On May 8th, a squadron including the Monitor, Galena and Nagatuck, bombarded our batteries at Sewall's Point. When our commander heard of this, he started down to meet the enemy, but before the Virginia reached Sewall's Point the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Shenandoah. (search)
ck. Frequent captures were made, and the smoke of the burning vessels made landmarks against the skies. News of the surrender. It was now in the middle of summer, and on June 23d Waddell captured two whalers which had left San Francisco in April, and had on board papers of April 17th, in which was found the correspondence between General Grant and General Lee, and a statement of the surrender at Appomattox, but the same papers also contained President Davis's proclamation from Danville, d when he was informed of the character of the vessel, he said: I was reading a few days ago of her being in the Arctic ocean. I asked for American news. He said the war had gone against the South. That was in November. Lee's surrender was in April. The quiet satisfaction seen in all countenances, says Captain Waddell, for our success in reaching a European port was unmistakable! We should think, indeed, there was cause. The chief danger was now past! Safe in the Mersey. On the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.49 (search)
he departure of the company from Port Gibson, Captain Hastings resigned, and Henry Hughes, author of Southern Sociology, and classmate of the great French imperialist, Paul Cassagnac, was elected in his stead. How well do I recollect that bright April day, when the ladies of Port Gibson presented to the Claiborne Guards, in Apollo Hall, a beautiful silken flag, wrought by their own fair hands! How our chivalric captain, Hughes, in responding to the address made on that occasion, promised thatsobs and tears of dear ones, we bade farewell to Port Gibson, while the loudmouthed cannon pealed forth its prophetic Godspeed. We faithfully kept the promise made by our gallant captain, for of the 125 comrades who left with us on that bright April day, but thirteen veterans now survive, and thirteen more who severed their connection with the company after the expiration of their first year's service. And the rest! Ah, where are they? Dead on the field of glory. They gave up their lives