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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 237 237 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 96 96 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 32 32 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 20 20 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 16 16 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Irene E. Jerome., In a fair country 16 16 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 15 15 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 14 14 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 14 14 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 14 14 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for April or search for April in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Dedication of a bronze tablet in honor of Botetourt Battery (search)
this month Captain Anderson was announced in general orders as Chief of Artillery, Stevenson's Division, and a little later, as Major of Artillery. First Lieutenant Philip Peters declining promotion in favor of Junior First Lieutenant John William Johnston, the latter officer was announced in general orders as captain of Anderson's Battery—henceforward known as the Botetourt Artillery. In March the Botetourt Artillery moved down to Jett's gin house, and remained there until the middle of April, doing picket duty at Warrenton, at Barton's headquarters, and at Glass gin house. During these spring weeks below Vicksburg life seems to have been sweet to the toil-worn, ragged, hope-on, hope-ever sons of Botetourt. When the Howitzer section reached Glass' gin house for picket duty, Mr. Glass came in full tilt from his house to tell us not to kill his big snake. Being a Virginian he knew what a Virginian would do with a snake on sight. The snake was one of those large kinds that are k
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Remarkable record of the Haskells of South Carolina. (search)
Singleton and her daughter were at the hospital at Charlottesville, crowded so that Mrs. Chestnut (as her diary tells) took the young girl for her room-mate. She was the free chronicler of records. Miss Singleton and Captain Haskell were engaged, and he wrote urgently for her consent to marry him at once. All was so uncertain in war, and he wished to have all his own while he lived. He got leave, came up to the hospital, and the wedding took place amid bright anticipations and showers of April tears. There was no single vacant space in the house. So Mrs. Chestnut gave up her room to the bridal pair. Duty called; the groom hurried back to it the day after the wedding. That day one year later the husband was a widower, with only the news from his far-away baby girl to solace the solitude of his tent. After the war Colonel Haskell married Miss Alice Alexander, sister of General E. P. Alexander. She died after becoming the mother of ten children, six of whom are daughters. A
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The cruise of the Shenandoah. (search)
crew of thirty-five men on board. Went up as far as Ghifinski and Tausk Bays, but could not enter for ice from fifteen to thirty feet thick. June 10 and 12 twelve of the Abigail's crew enlisted. June 14 we went out of Okhotsk Sea, through Amphitrite Straits. June 16 two more men enlisted, and on same evening entered Bering Sea, through the Aletuian Islands, going north towards Captain Navarin. June 23, captured whalers William Thompson and Susan Abigail, which left San Francisco in April, and brought papers of April 17, giving correspondence between Generals Grant and Lee and a statement of the surrender of the latter to the former at Appomattox, but they also contained President Davis' proclamation from Danville, Va., stating that the surrender would only cause the prosecution of the war with renewed vigor. We felt that the South had sustained great reverses, but at no time did we feel a more imperative duty to prosecute our work with vigor. Between June 2 and June 28,