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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 237 237 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 96 96 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 32 32 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 20 20 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 16 16 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Irene E. Jerome., In a fair country 16 16 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 15 15 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 14 14 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 14 14 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 14 14 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier). You can also browse the collection for April or search for April in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 4 document sections:

The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Personal Poems (search)
quietness at last! The common way that all have passed She went, with mortal yearnings fond, To fuller life and love beyond. Fold the rapt soul in your embrace, My dear ones! Give the singer place To you, to her,—I know not where,— I lift the silence of a prayer. For only thus our own we find; The gone before, the left behind, All mortal voices die between; The unheard reaches the unseen. Again the blackbirds sing; the streams Wake, laughing, from their winter dreams, And tremble in the April showers The tassels of the maple flowers. But not for her has spring renewed The sweet surprises of the wood; And bird and flower are lost to her Who was their best interpreter! What to shut eyes has God revealed? What hear the ears that death has sealed? What undreamed beauty passing show Requites the loss of all we know? O silent land, to which we move, Enough if there alone be love, And mortal need can ne'er outgrow What it is waiting to bestow! O white soul! from that far-off shore
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), At sundown (search)
psalm, Peace, and good — will to men! The vow of Washington. Read in New York, April 30, 1889, at the Centennial Celebration of the Inauguration of George Washington as the first President of the United States. the sword was sheathed: in April's sun Lay green the fields by Freedom won; And severed sections, weary of debates, Joined hands at last and were United States. O City sitting by the Sea! How proud the day that dawned on thee, When the new era, long desired, began, And, in itsr feast, the blueberries which I share With one who proffers with stained hands Her gleanings from yon pasture lands, Wild fruit that art and culture spoil, The harvest of an untilled soil; And with her one whose tender eyes Reflect the change of April skies, Midway 'twixt child and maiden yet, Fresh as Spring's earliest violet; And one whose look and voice and ways Make where she goes idyllic days; And one whose sweet, still countenance Seems dreamful of a child's romance; And others, welcome
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Appendix (search)
brother's blood, Crying in the ear of God, Gave the earth its primal stain; He whose mercy ever liveth, Who repenting guilt forgiveth, And the broken heart receiveth; Wanderer of the wilderness, Haunted, guilty, crazed, and wild, He regardeth thy distress, And careth for His sinful child! Tis springtime on the eastern hills! Like torrents gush the summer rills; Through winter's moss and dry dead leaves The bladed grass revives and lives, Pushes the mouldering waste away, For glimpses to the April day. In kindly shower and sunshine bud The branches of the dull gray wood; Out from its sunned and sheltered nooks The blue eye of the violet looks; The southwest wind is warmly blowing, And odors from the springing grass, The pine-tree and the sassafras, Are with it on its errands going. A band is marching through the wood Where rolls the Kennebec his flood; The warriors of the wilderness, Painted, and in their battle dress; And with them one whose bearded cheek, And white and wrinkled bro
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Index of first lines (search)
ip is still free, III. 47. Thanks for thy gift, IV. 54. The age is dull and mean. Men creep, III. 175. The autumn-time has come, II. 159. The beaver cut his timber, i. 241. The Benedictine Echard, II. 315. The birds against the April wind, III. 248. The blast from Freedom's Northern Hills, upon its Southern way, III. 80. The Brownie sits in the Scotchman's room, i. 25. The burly driver at my side, IV. 56. The cannon's brazen lips are cold, III. 329. The circle sky, II. 72. The sunlight glitters keen and bright, II. 14. The suns of eighteen centuries have shone, III. 275. The sun that brief December day, II. 135. The sweet spring day is glad with music, IV. 120. The sword was sheathed: in April's sun, IV. 286. The tall, sallow guardsmen their horsetails have spread, III. 356. The tent-lights glimmer on the land, III. 230. The threads our hands in blindness spin, II. 311. The time of gifts has come again, II. 64. The toss