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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The cruise of the Shenandoah. (search)
said he had been aide-de-camp to General (Bishop) Leonidas. Polk, C. S. A., who had been discharged as an invalid. With him as sergeant, a marine guard was organized. Sighted Drummond's Island and learned from natives in canoes that no vessels were there. Sighted Strong's Island and near enough to see no vessels in Chabrol Harbor. Sighted Mc-Askill Island. Sighted Ascension (Pouinipete or Ponapi Island) of Carolina group, about six degrees north and longitude 160 degrees east, and on April 1, looking into Lod Harbor of that island, found four whalers there. Took a pilot (an Englishman, named Thomas Harrocke, from Yorkshire, who had been a convict, and had lived on this island thirteen years) and anchored in the harbor. Sent off four boats and boarded each vessel and made prizes of American whalers Edward Carey, of San Francisco; Hector, of New Bedford; Pearl, of New London, and Harvest, from New Bedford, nominally from Honolulu, but really an American under false colors, ha
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Eleventh Kentucky Cavalry, C. S. A. From the Lexington, Ky. Herald, April 21, 1907. (search)
e head; and, after suffering intensely for a few hours, they invariably died. A case of recovery from it was unknown. About this time General Pegram made an unsuccessful raid into Central Kentucky, going as far as Danville. He was badly defeated at Somerset, as he was retreating. The Federal forces were pressing him sorely; his troops were much scattered and demoralized, and many were captured. It is probable that nearly all of them would have been captured, except for the fact that (April 1) Colonel Chenault marched his regiment to the Cumberland River and protected the crossing of Pegram's fugitives. General Pegram never forgave Colonel Chenault for this kindness, and from that date never lost an opportunity for annoying him. On April 18 the two companies of the Eleventh that had gone with Colonel Cluke on his raid in Eastern Kentucky, rejoined the regiment. They had suffered much loss on the raid. Captain Robt. B. Terrill and Lieutenant Seth Maupin, of Company E, were