hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 544 544 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 21 21 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 20 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 17 17 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 16 16 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 10 10 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 10 10 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 9 9 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 9 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 9 9 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for April 2nd or search for April 2nd in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 5 document sections:

as such from April 27th (inclusive) to April 29th, are made as clear as the fact that the surrender had not absolutely been accomplished. Mumford was still a citizen of a Confederate city, in which Confederates, having evacuated the city with their army, had not yet abdicated their civil authority. On April 28th Mayor Monroe had no intimation that it was by your (Farragut's) orders, that the United States flag was attempted to be hoisted upon certain of our public edifices. On April 29th, two days after Mumford's act, Flag-officer Farragut addressed the following communication to Mayor Monroe. It was delivered to the mayor by two naval officers from the fleet: U. S. Flag-ship Hartford, At anchor off the city of New Orleans, April 29, 1862. His Honor, the Mayor of the City of New Orleans, Sir: The forts, Saint Philip and Jackson, having surrendered and all the military defenses of the city being either captured or abandoned, you are required, as the sole representative
n which was to twine his military column with laurel, that on the 13th he wrote to Halleck at Washington, leaving General Franklin to continue his march as expeditiously to Alexandria as possible, I shall proceed immediately to that point. On April 2d he was reporting to the same official his arrival in Alexandria. He showed no anxiety about his rear, nor any fear that his garrisons in New Orleans, Baton Rouge and Port Hudson would be much missed from his imposing advance. If numbers could terior of Texas for the sole purpose of destroying or dispersing his forces if it be in my power. . .. Taylor's forces are said to be on that line (Sabine town). This will not, he adds arrogantly, divert us from our movement. Thus he wrote on April 2d, making much of A. J. Smith's 10,000 men, borrowed from General Sherman. A small string was attached, by the way, to this loan of Smith's division. Banks had agreed to return the men to Sherman within three months. He never once doubted that
orders, second in command to the commander of the forces. General Johnston knew well that General Grant's army, massed at Pittsburg Landing about 22 miles from Corinth, was daily expecting Don Carlos Buell He fully understood the value that lay in striking a sudden blow before Buell could join Grant. He himself had hoped to move his army on April 1st, so as to make sure of attacking Grant on Saturday, April 5th, before the junction could take place. The army began its march on April 3d, two days after the date originally fixed. The next day rains, not heavy but persistent, flooded creeks, scattered bridges, bogged roads and stalled batteries. Every nerve was strained in rank and file to make progress on Thursday. The sun refused to shine out until Friday afternoon, at which hour the Confederates were a day's journey from the enemy's advance. The army bivouacked in his front Saturday about 5 p. m. The day was too far gone to open the attack that afternoon. A small fact; but
light. Again and again the efforts of the Federals to rescue their position were repulsed with bloody slaughter, but before long the inevitable happened Overwhelmed from all sides, the gallant Confederates were forced back to their own lines, leaving many brave men dead and wounded. On the 29th Grant sent Sheridan westward, and April 1st was the day of battle of Five Forks. Elated, the Federal commander opened a bombardment along the line, and ordered an assault early on the morning of April 2d. At 2 p. m. the enemy advanced upon Forts Gregg and Whitworth. Around these two forts, Petersburg, hard pressed, will make her final stand. The disproportion between assailants and defenders was appalling—214 men in Fort Gregg; about the same in Fort Whitworth. Against these moved 5,000 men—crazed with the delirium of the new wine of success after the old wine of defeat—straight upon our right. During the Federal assault in the morning orders had been hastily given by Lieut.-Col. W<
llery is now made out to their last battle. That record cannot be safely impeached. The ceremonies of surrender were simple but most impressive, by reason of their very simplicity. With the carnage of the whole four years behind them stand the representatives of two mighty armies. On this day, April 9, 1865, a chasm long yawning was filled. Between Robert E. Lee and Ulysses S. Grant rose, supreme, the humanities of God! President Jefferson Davis, having left Richmond on the night of April 2d, proceeded to Charlotte, N. C. While in that city, the news of President Lincoln's assassination came to fill him with horror—a horror which he never ceased strongly to express during the remainder of his long and eminent life. He finally resolved to cross over to the Trans-Mississippi department. On his way to Washington, Ga., he was protected by a bodyguard of honorable veterans drawn from every State in the Confederacy. Each man of the escort felt himself honored by the high trust con