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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 371 371 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 18 18 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 15 15 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 12 12 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 11 11 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 10 10 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 10 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 8 8 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 8 8 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 7 7 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Red River campaign. (search)
en able to pass the difficult rapids that obstruct the navigation just above Alexandria. The leading gun-boat, Eastport, hung nearly three days on the rocks; the hospital steamer, Woodford, following her, was wrecked, and it was not until the 3d of April that the last of the thirteen gun-boats The 13 gun-boats sent up were the Eastport, Chillicothe, Carondelet, Louisville, Mound City, Pittsburgh, Osage, Ozark, Neosho, Fort Hindiman, Cricket, Juliet, and Lexington. See The Navy in the Red Rry, long looked for, should arrive from Texas. Mower returned to Alexandria and Taylor withdrew to Natchitoches. While the navy was occupied in passing the rapids, the advance of the army, on the 27th, took up the line of march, and on the 3d of April the whole force was concentrated near Natchitoches, the gun-boats and the twenty-six transports carrying A. J. Smith's corps and the stores having arrived at Grand Ecore, four miles distant, on the same day. Here General John M. Corse overtook
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The navy in the Red River. (search)
dibly short time the country would be denuded of fences as far as the eye could see. So dependent were we upon these rails for fuel that it was a saying among the Confederates that they should have destroyed the fences and not the cotton. Had they done so, our progress would have been much slower. As it was, it proved a laborious task for the crews of the gun-boats to cut up these cotton-wood rails in lengths to fit the furnaces, which were much shorter than those of the transports. On April 3d, Acting Volunteer Lieutenant J. P. Couthouy, commanding the iron-clad Chillicothe, was shot by a guerrilla a few miles above Grand Ecore. He was a brave officer, and his loss was much lamented in the squadron. April 7th, Admiral Porter, on the Cricket, bearing his flag, left Grand Ecore for Shreveport, accompanied by the Osage, Neosho, Fort Hindman, Lexington, and Chillicothe, convoying twenty transports, containing General Kilby Smith's division of the Sixteenth Army Corps; a rendezvou
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the campaign of the Carolinas. (search)
l. M. F. Wood, Capt. David Gillespie; 25th Ind., Lieut.-Col. James S. Wright, Maj. William H. Crenshaw, Lieut.-Col. J. S. Wright; 32d Wis., Col. Charles H. DeGroat, Lieut.-Col. Joseph H. Carleton, Maj. William H. Burrows. Third division, Brig.-Gen. Mortimer D. Leggett, Brig.-Gen. Manning F. Force, Brig.-Gen. Mortimer D. Leggett. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Manning F. Force, Col. Cassius Fairchild, Brig.-Gen. Manning F. Force, Brig.-Gen. Charles Ewing: 20th Ill. (provost-guard of division to April 3d), Capt. Henry King; 30th Ill., Lieut.-Col. William C. Rhodes, Capt. John P. Davis; 31st Ill., Lieut.-Col. Robert N. Pearson; 45th Ill., Maj. John O. Duer; 12th Wis., Col. James K. Proudfit; 16th Wis., Capt. Joseph Craig, Col. Cassius Fairchild, Capt. Joseph Craig, Col. Cassius Fairchild. Second Brigade, Col. Greenberry F. Wiles, Brig.-Gen. Robert K. Scott: 20th Ohio, Lieut.-Col. Harrison Wilson; 68th Ohio, Lieut.-Col. George E. Welles; 78th Ohio, Capt. Israel C. Robinson, Col. G. F. Wiles,
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Closing operations in the James River. (search)
steam, which was the cause of our returning. The whole blame rests with the two pilots of the Virginia. editors. About the middle of February Commodore Mitchell was replaced in the command of the James River squadron by Admiral Semmes, lately the commander of the Alabama. During the six weeks that followed there was very little that the squadron could do. The obstructions at Trent's Reach had been strengthened, and additions had been made to the fleet below. Meantime the Union armies were closing in about Richmond, and at length the fall of the city was inevitable. On the 2d of April, in obedience to orders from Secretary Mallory, Semmes blew up his vessels, landed his men, and proceeded by rail to Danville, N. C., where he remained until Johnston's surrender. On the 3d of April Richmond was occupied, and on the following day the Malvern, Admiral Porter's flag-ship, carried President Lincoln up to the late capital of the Confederacy. Music on Sheridan's line of battle.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The fall of Richmond. (search)
ide-de-camp on the staff of Gen. Weitzel. In the spring of 1865 the total length of the lines of the Army of the James before Richmond (under General Godfrey Weitzel, commanding the Twenty-fifth Corps) was about eleven miles, not counting the cavalry front, and extended from the Appomattox River to the north side of the James. The Varina and New Market turnpikes passed directly through the lines into the city, which was the center of all our efforts. About 2 o'clock on the morning of April 3d bright fires were seen in the direction of Richmond. Shortly after, while we were looking at these fires, we heard explosions, and soon a prisoner was sent in by General Kautz. The prisoner was a colored teamster, and he informed us that immediately after dark the enemy had begun making preparations to leave, and that they were sending all of the teams to the rear. A forward movement of our entire picket-line corroborated this report. As soon as it was light General Weitzel ordered Colo
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 18.114 (search)
, under cover of darkness, either by the Burnsville and River roads, or by swimming the Alabama River. A portion of Upton's division pursued on the Burnsville road until long after midnight, capturing four guns and many prisoners. I estimate the entire garrison, including the militia of the city and surrounding country, at 7000 men; the entire force under my command, engaged and in supporting distance, was 9000 men and eight guns. General Upton's division was dispatched from Selma, on April 3d, to open communications with McCook and Croxton, west of the Cahawba. McCook had found the Confederate Jackson between him and Croxton, and had returned east of the Cahawba. He reached Selma in company with Upton on the 6th. Nothing was learned of Croxton. On the 6th of April, having ordered Major Hubbard to lay a bridge over the Alabama with the utmost dispatch, I went to Cahawba to see General Forrest, who had agreed to meet me there under a flag of truce for the purpose of arrangin