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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 371 371 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 18 18 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 15 15 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 12 12 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 11 11 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 10 10 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 10 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 8 8 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 8 8 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 7 7 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for April 3rd or search for April 3rd in all documents.

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our obedient servant, Thornton A. Jenkins, Captain. Rear-Admiral D. G. Farragut, Flag-Ship Hartford, Mobile Bay. Additional report of Captain J. B. Marchand. U. S. Steam-sloop Lackawanna, Mobile Bay, Aug. 9, 1864. sir: In the action of the fifth instant the following named petty officers, and others of inferior rating, were conspicuous for their energy and bravery, and deserve medals of honor; but under the fourth rule of the General Order of the Navy Department No. 10, dated April third, 1863, their special signal acts of valor cannot be cited so as to authorize me to recommend their obtaining medals: 1. William Phinney, Boatswain's Mate, as captain of a gun, showed much presence of mind and coolness in managing it, and the great encouragement he gave the crew. 2. John Smith, Captain Forecastle, was first captain of a gun, and finding that he could not sufficiently depress his gun when alongside of the rebel iron-clad Tennessee, threw a hand holystone into one of t
achment of cavalry to seize and hold Elkins's Ferry, and turned the direction of the main body of the army southward, at right angles with the former course. The troops sent forward on the military road encountered Marmaduke and Shelby in force, and kept them in play; but at the same time, Shelby attacked the rear of the army, under command of Brigadier-General Rice, near the crossing of the Terre Noir. The enemy attacked with great bravery, and were repulsed with heavy loss. On the third of April, the entire command crossed the Little Red River at Elkins's Ferry, and so well planned had been the movement, and so promptly executed, that it was not until the evening of that day, and by accident, that the enemy learned that the army had crossed. On this day, Colonel Engleman's brigade had a serious engagement at Okolona, and soundly thrashed the enemy. On the succeeding day, Marmaduke and Cabell, with a force of four or five thousand men, made a furious attack, but were easily dri
his gunboats, accompanied him, and it is now the headquarters of the army and navy. The rebels seem to have contemplated holding Grand Ecore, for on the bluffs around the settlement the remains of works intended for large guns and as rifle-pits, may be seen. These were built last summer when General Banks made a feint upon Shreveport by way of diverting the attention of the enemy from his attack upon Port Hudson. No attempt was made to fortify it when the present movement began on Sunday, April third. General Banks arrived here, and went into camp in a beautiful meadow ground, skirted by pine woods, about two hundred yards shore, and near a small shallow stream, with pine trees growing in it, which the inhabitants call a lake. The headquarters of General Franklin were at Natchitoches. That army consisted of about twenty thousand men, and was thus commanded: The cavalry by General Lee, formerly of Grant's army — said to be a favorite of the Lieutenant-General, and with the repu