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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 371 371 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 18 18 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 15 15 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 12 12 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 11 11 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 10 10 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 10 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 8 8 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 8 8 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 7 7 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for April 3rd or search for April 3rd in all documents.

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of field artillery In the wake of Lee's retreat the ruins of railroad bridge at Petersburg April, 1865 The scene that met the eyes of the Union cavalry on April 3d. The ashes of a bridge, locomotive, train and all, as they had fallen the day before on the gravelly shore of the Appotomax. When the lines southeast and west icers and men was such as to reflect [honor] on our cause and cast a luster of glory over the profession of arms. This is one of the series of photographs taken April 3d by the enterprising artist with the Federal army; and the clock-face in the courthouse tower shows that the picture was made at ten minutes of four that afternooee, who was In Petersburg — after nine months of battering This fine mansion on Bolingbroke Street, the residential section of Petersburg, has now, on the 3d of April, fallen into the hands of straggling Union soldiers. Its windows have long since been shattered by shells from distant Federal mortars; one has even burst thro
of field artillery In the wake of Lee's retreat the ruins of railroad bridge at Petersburg April, 1865 The scene that met the eyes of the Union cavalry on April 3d. The ashes of a bridge, locomotive, train and all, as they had fallen the day before on the gravelly shore of the Appotomax. When the lines southeast and west icers and men was such as to reflect [honor] on our cause and cast a luster of glory over the profession of arms. This is one of the series of photographs taken April 3d by the enterprising artist with the Federal army; and the clock-face in the courthouse tower shows that the picture was made at ten minutes of four that afternooee, who was In Petersburg — after nine months of battering This fine mansion on Bolingbroke Street, the residential section of Petersburg, has now, on the 3d of April, fallen into the hands of straggling Union soldiers. Its windows have long since been shattered by shells from distant Federal mortars; one has even burst thro
from traverse to traverse. Even then, after a breathing space, the Confederates, in a brave assault, recaptured a portion of the works and held on until driven back by a brilliant charge of Griffin's men. Cheering the victors of Petersburg, April 3d Here, on the gabioned parapet of Fort Hell (Sedgwick), the garrison left behind, with shouts and waving of hats and firing of muskets, are signalling their enthusiasm at the success of their comrades, who now hold the works of the old antagon the sky lurid from thousands of shells bursting in the arsenal, the falling of the broken fragments among the already panic stricken fugitives — all these features created a scene such as the world has seldom witnessed. Early in the morning of April 3d the clatter of Federal cavalry was heard in the streets. The Stars and Stripes waved. Richmond was the capital of the Confederacy no longer. Union, Maj.-Gens. Stanley and Bradley wounded; Confed., Maj.-Gen. Cleburne, Brig.-Gens. Adams,