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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 371 371 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 18 18 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 15 15 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 12 12 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 11 11 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 10 10 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 10 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 8 8 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 8 8 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 7 7 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for April 3rd or search for April 3rd in all documents.

Your search returned 10 results in 6 document sections:

William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 3: Berkshire County. (search)
er 17th, The selectmen were authorized to borrow three thousand dollars to pay bounties. 1865. Two meetings were held April 3d and 15th, at which thirty-eight hundred dollars were appropriated for the payment of State aid to soldiers' families. Jown, a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars; and they were directed to enlist troops for this purpose. 1865. April 3d, Voted, to raise money to pay State aid to the families of volunteers during the year. Mount Washington furnished twee authorized to borrow four thousand dollars, to pay bounties for thirty-two men to fill the quota of the town. 1865. April 3d, The selectmen were authorized to borrow money to pay State aid to the families of volunteers. A vote of thanks was paseasurer was authorized to borrow money for that purpose. Voted, to assess a tax of thirty-two hundred dollars. 1865. April 3d, Voted, to pay the expenses heretofore incurred in recruiting volunteers to fill the quota of the town; and to raise fif
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 4: Bristol County. (search)
enlisting to fill the quota of the town, provided that not more than one hundred and twenty-five dollars be paid to each person; and to each citizen or resident of the town who enlisted since Oct. 17, 1863, who had received a less sum than others, be paid seventy-five dollars. July 30th, The selectmen were authorized to borrow five thousand three hundred and seventy-five dollars to recruit the quota of the town under the recent call of the President for five hundred thousand men. 1865. April 3d, The payment of State aid to the families of volunteers was continued for the year; and the selectmen were directed to continue to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for three years to the credit of the town, and so continued to the end of the war. The selectmen reported in 1866 that the town had furnished two hundred and fifty-seven men for the war; but it must have furnished about three hundred, as it filled each of its quotas, and at
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 6: Essex County. (search)
by any citizen, upon satisfactory proof thereof it shall be repaid by the town to the person by whom it was advanced. The treasurer was authorized to borrow such sums of money as might be required to carry the above votes into effect. 1865. April 3d, The treasurer was authorized to borrow, not exceeding three thousand dollars, for State aid to the families of volunteers. August 18th, Voted, to refund the sum of eighteen hundred dollars to such persons as contributed the same in aid of, andthaniel Little, Jr., Joseph N. Rolfe, Henry T. Pearson. The town-clerk during the entire war was William Little. The town-treasurer in 1861 was Joseph N. Rolfe; in 1862, 1863, 1864, and 1865, Isaac W. Little. 1861. A town-meeting was held April 3d, with reference to the state of the country, at which the following preamble and resolutions were adopted:— Whereas, by a systematized course of misrepresentation, calumny, and fraud, a confederate band of traitors have succeeded in plungin
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 8: Hampden County. (search)
ur cents, in obedience to a law passed April 29, 1863, entitled an act for the reimbursement of bounties paid to volunteers. 1864. April 4th, Five hundred dollars were appropriated for aid to soldiers' families. Two thousand two hundred and sixty dollars were raised for reimbursement of money paid by citizens to volunteers since Oct. 17, 1863. July 15th, The bounty to be paid volunteers was fixed at one hundred and twenty-five dollars, and so remained until the end of the war. 1865. April 3d, The selectmen were authorized to borrow money to refund to individuals the amounts of money they had voluntarily contributed to aid recruiting, and to those who had furnished substitutes for the army. Agawam furnished one hundred and seventy-two men for the war, which was a surplus of ten over and above all demands. Four were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was seventeen thousand and
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 9: Hampshire County. (search)
payment of State aid to the families of volunteers. 1864. April 20th, Voted, to pay one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each of the eleven persons who have volunteered as substitutes to fill the quota of the town. At a meeting held August 27th, a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars was directed to be paid to volunteers enlisting to the credit of the town, on the last call of the President for more men. The selectmen were authorized to borrow money to pay the same. 1865. April 3d, Voted, to raise five hundred dollars to pay bounties and fifteen hundred dollars for State aid to the soldiers' families; also to pay Henry S. Upton, Dexter M. Oaks, Forest M. Hanson, and Henry Peirce, one hundred and twenty-five dollars apiece at the time of their being mustered out of service. May 6th, Voted, to refund all money paid by subscription or otherwise, as allowed by law, to encourage enlistments. The treasurer was authorized to borrow money for that purpose. Prescott furn
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 12: Norfolk County. (search)
nt of bounties. 1863. August 29th, The selectmen were authorized to pay State aid to the families of drafted men the same as to families of volunteers. November 7th, Two thousand dollars were appropriated for aid to soldiers' families and for recruiting expenses. 1864. August 4th, The bounty for each volunteer who should enlist for three years and be credited to the quota of the town was fixed at one hundred and twenty-five dollars, and so continued until the end of the war. 1865. April 3d, Two thousand dollars were appropriated for payment of money expended the past year in raising volunteers to fill the quota of the town. July 26th, The selectmen were authorized to examine and allow all claims of individuals who had contributed money, or procured substitutes, to fill the quota of the town, provided that parties aggrieved shall have the right to appeal to the town. Walpole furnished about two hundred and twenty-six men for the war, and had a surplus of eighteen over and