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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 367 367 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 16 16 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 15 15 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 12 12 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 11 11 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 10 10 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 8 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 8 8 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 8 8 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 6 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. You can also browse the collection for April 5th or search for April 5th in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 1.1 (search)
e enemy attacked Fort McAllister with an iron-clad, three gun-boats, and a mortar-boat, and also, on the 3d of March, with three monitors. He was evidently trying his hand before his final venture against Fort Sumter. But the result must sorely have disappointed him; for notwithstanding the vigor of these two engagements — the first lasting more than two hours, the second at least seven--the Confederate battery was found, after inspection, to have sustained no material damage. On the 5th of April the enemy's force had materially increased in the Stono and the North Edisto. His iron-clads, including the frigate New Ironsides and eight monitors, had crossed the outer bar and cast anchor in the main channel. No doubt could be had of their intention. Two days later,--on the 7th,--a date ever memorable in the annals of the late war, the signal for the attack on Fort Sumter, so long anticipated and so long delayed, was finally given. First steamed up, in line, one following the
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The navy in the Red River. (search)
r below Shreveport. The river was stationary, at a lower stage than usual at this season, and there was barely water to float the gun-boats. April 10th, the fleet, as agreed upon, arrived at Springfield Landing, about 30 miles, as the crow flies, from its destination, meeting with no obstruction beyond the usual amount of bushwhacking. Here the channel was found obstructed by the sinking of a large steamboat, the New Falls City, This steamer was sunk, as stated in the text, on the 5th of April by Captain James McCloskey, acting under the orders of Generals E. K. Smith and Taylor. After the return of the fleet to Grand Ecore, the obstruction had to be removed before the Confederates could recover the use of the river.--editors. across the channel, both ends resting upon the banks. Of the disastrous results of the battles of Sabine Cross-roads and Pleasant Hill, April 8th and 9th, the fleet were entirely ignorant until a courier reached Admiral Porter from General Banks stating
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the campaign of the Carolinas. (search)
h Minn., Maj. George A. Camp; 174th Ohio, Col. John S. Jones; 178th Ohio, Col. Joab A. Stafford. Artillery: 22d Ind. (transferred to First Division, Tenth Corps, April 5th), Lieut. George W. Alexander: F, 1st Mich. (ordered to New Berne April 6th), Capt. Byron D. Paddock; Elgin, Ill. (assigned April 8th), Capt. Andrew M. Wood. SLieut.-Col. James A. Bope; 181st Ohio, Lieut.-Col. John E. Hudson, Col. John O'Dowd; 183d Ohio, Col. George W. Hoge. Artillery: 15th Ind. (detached at Wilmington April 5th), Capt. Alonzo D. Harvey; 19th Ohio, Capt. Frank Wilson. Third division, Brig.-Gen. James W. Reilly, Brig.-Gen. Samuel P. Carter. Provost Guard: F, 100th OhiWood; I, 3d N. Y., Lieut. William Richardson. cavalry: 12th N. Y., Col. James W. Savage; L, 1st N. C., Capt. George W. Graham. Reserve artillery (organized April 5th), Capt. William E. Mercer: C, 3d N. Y., Lieut. E. Barton Wood; D, 3d N. Y., Capt. Stephen Van Heusen; G, 3d N. Y., Capt. Wm. A. Kelsey; I, 3d N. Y., Lieut. Wm. R
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Five Forks and the pursuit of Lee. (search)
ead. The general, who never manifested the slightest sign of emotion either in victories or defeats, merely said: I am sorry I did not get this before we left the President. However, I suppose he has heard the news by this time, and then added: Let the news be circulated among the troops as rapidly as possible. Grant and Meade both went into camp at Sutherland's Station that evening, the 3d. The Army of Capture of guns and the destruction of a Confederate wagon-train at Paineville, April 5, by Davies's cavalry Brigade of Crook's division. From a sketch made at the time. The wagon-train was escorted by Gary's cavalry with five guns. General Humphreys, in The Virginia campaign, says it is believed that the papers of General. Robert E. Lee's headquarters, containing many valuable reports, copies of but few of which are now to be found, were destroyed by the burning of these wagons. the Potomac caught a few hours' sleep, and at 3 o'clock the next morning was again on the m
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 18.113 (search)
anding. Left Wing (Army of Georgia), Maj.-Gen. H. W. Slocum, commanding. Center (Army of the Ohio), Maj.-Gen. J. M. Schofield, commanding. Cavalry, Brevet Maj.-Gen. Judson Kilpatrick, commanding. Each of these commanders was authorized to exercise the powers prescribed by law for a general commanding a separate department or army in the field.--editors. The Tenth and Twenty-third corps had already been constituted an army known as the Army of the Ohio, with Schofield as commander. On April 5th General Sherman issued a confidential order to the army and corps commanders and the chiefs of the staff departments. It stated that the next grand objective was to place his armies north of the Roanoke River, facing west, and in full communication with the Army of the Potomac. Everything was to be in readiness on April 10th, and the movement was to commence on the morning of the 11th. The Army of Georgia was to have the left, the Army of the Ohio the center, and the Army of the Tenness
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 18.114 (search)
capturing four pieces of artillery and several hundred small-arms, near 300 prisoners rejoining the corps; the men in fine spirits and the animals in good condition, having lost in all but four officers and 168 men, half of the latter having been captured at various points, while straggling from foraging parties and not in line of duty. His operations since his separation from the main column, at Elyton, March 30th, covered a skirmish at Trion, Alabama, April 2d; the capture of Tuscaloosa, April 5th, and the destruction of the Military School, together with military stores and public works, at that place. From Tuscaloosa he had returned northward as far as Jasper, recrossed the Black Warrior, and, after destroying the iron works and factories along the route, reached Carrollton, Georgia, on the 25th of April, and soon opened communications with Wilson. On the 13th of April I received notice of the final capitulation of the rebel forces east of the Chattahoochee, and the next day,