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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 367 367 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 16 16 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 15 15 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 12 12 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 11 11 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 10 10 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 8 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 8 8 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 8 8 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 6 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for April 5th or search for April 5th in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 5 document sections:

William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 3: Berkshire County. (search)
town the selectmen were directed to pay the same bounty to volunteers for nine months service, who enlist and are credited to the quota of the town. 1863. At the annual meeting held on the 2d of March, the town voted to place the whole matter of paying State aid to soldiers' families with the selectmen, who were to act according to their discretion; and on the 26th of September they were directed to pay State aid to the families of drafted men the same as to volunteers. 1864. On the 5th of April a town-meeting was held, at which the selectmen were authorized to borrow money, and to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist for three years military service, and be mustered in and credited to the quota of the town; and at another meeting, held on the 16th of December, they were directed to continue recruiting and the payment of bounties, to fill the anticipated quota of the town under another call of the President for volunteers; and to
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 4: Bristol County. (search)
ting on the 3d of August, the town voted to pay its proportion of money to the State treasurer, in accordance with section 9 of chapter 116 of the Acts of 1863. Also to pay State aid to the families of drafted men. 1864. On the 29th of March the town voted to refund to citizens the money they had contributed to pay bounties and encourage recruiting to fill the quota of the town on the last call of the President for volunteers. The treasurer was authorized to borrow the money. On the 5th of April the bounty to each volunteer who should enlist to the credit of the town was fixed at one hundred and twenty-five dollars. Several other meetings were held during the year, to raise money and means to obtain volunteers, pay State aid to soldiers' families, and to reimburse citizens who had advanced money to encourage recruiting. The selectmen in 1866 reported that the town had furnished five hundred and twenty-four men for the war; but the real number was probably about six hundred
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 10: Middlesex County. (search)
the President, and had a surplus of thirteen. July 18th, Lowell was required to furnish six hundred and twenty-seven men under a recent call of the President. July 26th, Voted, to pay each volunteer for three years service, when mustered in and credited to the quota of the city, a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars in gold, or its equivalent. The Sixth Regiment volunteered its services for one hundred days service, being the fourth time it had been placed in service. 1865. April 5th, A mass meeting was held to rejoice over the fall of Richmond. On the 10th, another meeting was held to rejoice over the surrender of General Lee and his army. On the 15th, information of the assassination of President Lincoln was received, which caused gladness to be turned to sorrow. The flags were placed at half mast, and emblems of mourning were everywhere displayed. The dedication of the monument erected to the memory of Ladd and Whitney was to have taken place on the 19th, the fo
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 12: Norfolk County. (search)
pay a bounty of one hundred and fifty dollars to each volunteer enlisting to fill the quota of the town for men in the nine-months' service, and a committee of citizens was chosen to co-operate with the town-treasurer in devising ways and means to obtain the necessary amount of money. 1863. No meeting appears to have been held during this year in relation to the war. Recruiting, however, went on as usual, and the State aid continued to be paid to the families of the volunteers. 1864. April 5th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer enlisting to the credit of the town, under the recent call of the President for more men. July 5th, Voted, to pay the same amount of bounty to each volunteer under any call of the President, prior to March 1st, 1865. Canton furnished three hundred and fifty men for the war, which was a surplus of twenty-three over and above all demands. Nine were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appropria
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 15: Worcester County. (search)
for three years and be credited to the quota of the town before the 1st of August next. August 22d, The time was extended until the quota of the town was filled. A bounty of one hundred dollars was authorized to be paid to any inhabitant of the town who shall enlist in the nine months-service. October—, Voted, to pay the same bounty to commissioned officers. 1863. December 8th, James Miller, Charles Adams, Jr., and T. M. Duncan were chosen to aid the selectmen in recruiting. 1864. April 5th, The bounty to each volunteer enlisting for three years and credited to the quota of the town was fixed at one hundred and twenty-five dollars. June 26th, Voted, that a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars be paid for one-year's men, two hundred and twenty-five dollars for two-years men, and three hundred and twenty-five dollars for three-years men. There was no substantial change from this system during the remainder of the war. North Brookfield furnished two hundred and fort