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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 1.1 (search)
tery, under Lieutenant Henry R. Lesesne, with a detachment of regulars from Fort Sumter. Two guns were engaged: one 10-inch Columbiad and one 8-inch Dahlgren. The number of guns actually engaged on our side against the iron-clad fleet, on the 7th of April, was therefore 69, of which five were mortars. Two companies of infantry had been placed on Sullivan's and Morris islands, to guard against a land attack. Commodore Ingraham had also been cautioned to hold the gun-boats Palmetto State and en, mortally wounding one, slightly wounding Lieutenant Steedman, in charge of the gun, and three men. G. T. B. [See also papers to follow.] In the communication sent by me to the War Department, dated May 24th, with regard to the attack of April 7th, I made the following statement: The action lasted two hours and twenty-five minutes, but the chief damage is reported by the enemy to have been done in thirty minutes. The Keokuk did not come nearer than nine hundred yards of Fort Sumter;
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Confederate defense of Fort Sumter. (search)
n another place the parapet was loosened for twenty-five feet of its length, some of the bricks falling out and exposing the gun-carriage behind it. The magazines of the fort naturally gave the defenders special concern. There were four, situated at the extremities of the gorge, nearest to Morris Island, and in pairs, one over the other. The stonework built for their protection externally had been carried up only to the tops of the lower magazines. All were used in the naval fight of April 7th, forthey were not then so imperiled by a naval fire as later when the eastern wall became reduced in height, and the monitors could look into the arches of the western casemates. Before Gillmore's guns opened, on the 17th of August, his operations on Morris Island caused the upper magazines to be abandoned and partly filled with sand to protect the lower ones. Only the eastern magazine then became endangered by his fire, and that so gradually as to allow ample time for the removal of its
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Du Pont's attack at Charleston. (search)
convinced that the force given him could not accomplish the end desired. His effort, therefore, on the evening of the 7th of April, may be looked upon as a reconnoissance in force, showing that the plan he had formed for the capture of Charleston wad men, and sacrificed himself to the clamor and disappointment evoked by his defeat. In the brief engagement of the 7th of April, the Keokuk, the ironclad that was nearest to Sumter, was struck ninety times; nineteen shots pierced her armor at or hile temporarily commanding the Catskill, the same monitor he had commanded under Admiral Du Pont in the action of the 7th of April. He had taken his ship very close to the enemy, resolved that no one should be closer than he, when a heavy shot strueanwhile, the dispatches reciting the details of the battle Rear-Admiral J. A. Dahlgren. From a photograph. of the 7th of April had, on their way north, crossed the orders from the Government, and after they were received with their development o
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The army before Charleston in 1863. (search)
ers held similar views. At Washington it was deemed of so much importance to present an actively aggressive front in this quarter in aid of projected operations elsewhere that orders were issued by the President himself to hold the position inside of Charleston bar, and to prevent the erection of new batteries and new defenses on Morris Island, and if such batteries had been begun by the enemy to drive him out. A keen sense of disappointment pervaded the Navy Department at the repulse of April 7th, finding expression, among the higher officials, in a determination to retrieve the fortunes of that day, and reinstate the ironclads in the confidence of the country at the earliest possible moment. The gallantry of the attack, the skill with which the fleet had been handled, the terrific fire to which it had been exposed, and the prudence that prompted its recall before a simple repulse could be converted into overwhelming disaster were measurably lost sight of in the chagrin of defeat.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The navy in the Red River. (search)
ot the cotton. Had they done so, our progress would have been much slower. As it was, it proved a laborious task for the crews of the gun-boats to cut up these cotton-wood rails in lengths to fit the furnaces, which were much shorter than those of the transports. On April 3d, Acting Volunteer Lieutenant J. P. Couthouy, commanding the iron-clad Chillicothe, was shot by a guerrilla a few miles above Grand Ecore. He was a brave officer, and his loss was much lamented in the squadron. April 7th, Admiral Porter, on the Cricket, bearing his flag, left Grand Ecore for Shreveport, accompanied by the Osage, Neosho, Fort Hindman, Lexington, and Chillicothe, convoying twenty transports, containing General Kilby Smith's division of the Sixteenth Army Corps; a rendezvous being agreed upon with the army within three days at Springfield Landing, 110 miles by the river below Shreveport. The river was stationary, at a lower stage than usual at this season, and there was barely water to float
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the campaign of the Carolinas. (search)
s), Lieut. H. Shannon; Fla. Battery, Capt. Henry F. Abell; I, 10th N. C. Batt'n, Capt. Thomas I. Southerland; 3d N. C. Batt'n Art'y, Maj. John W. Moore; 13th N. C. Batt'n Art'y, Lieut.-Col. Joseph B. Starr; Pioneer Reg't, Col. John G. Tucker; Naval Brigade, Rear-Admiral Raphael Semmes. General Johnston reported his effective strength of infantry and artillery as follows: March 17th, 9513; March 23d, 15,027; March 27th, 14,678 (on this date the cavalry numbered 4093); March 31st, 16,014; April 7th, 18,182; April 17th, 14,770; April 24th, 15,188. In his official report General Wheeler says that he had under his immediate command at the commencement of the campaign 4442 effectives; on February 16th, 5172, and on April 17th, 4965. The number of troops (combatants and non-combatants) paroled at Greensboro' was 30,045 ; at Salisbury, 2987, and at Charlotte, 4015, making a grand total of 37,047. General Johnston ( Narrative, p. 410) says: The meeting between General Sherman and myself