Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for April 7th or search for April 7th in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
nor to be, your very obedient servant, G. J. Van Brunt, Captain U. S. N. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy. Assuming, Mr. Editor, the account of Captain Van Brunt to be correct, how does the claim that the Monitor whipped the Merrimac on that occasion stand? Respectfully, Wm. H. Parker. The Army of Tennessee. By Colonel Wm. Preston Johnston. [The following eloquent response to a toast at the splendid banquet of the Army of Tennessee Association, in New Orleans the 7th of April last, is a fitting eulogy on as brave men as the world ever saw, and we are glad of the privilege of putting it on our record. Colonel Johnston was received by the veterans with great enthusiasm and cheered to the echo when he took his seat.] Colonel Johnston said: Soldiers of the Army of Tennessee,—In rising, at your invitation, to respond to the sentiment just announced, I feel a deep embarrassment. In any other presence I could stand forth unabashed as the chronicler of your de
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Army of Tennessee. (search)
The Army of Tennessee. By Colonel Wm. Preston Johnston. [The following eloquent response to a toast at the splendid banquet of the Army of Tennessee Association, in New Orleans the 7th of April last, is a fitting eulogy on as brave men as the world ever saw, and we are glad of the privilege of putting it on our record. Colonel Johnston was received by the veterans with great enthusiasm and cheered to the echo when he took his seat.] Colonel Johnston said: Soldiers of the Army of Tennessee,—In rising, at your invitation, to respond to the sentiment just announced, I feel a deep embarrassment. In any other presence I could stand forth unabashed as the chronicler of your deeds and the eulogist of your martial virtues. There are many links that bind me to you. It was at Camp Borne, Tennessee, that I did my first service in helping to build up the frame work of your army; and though I was soon transferred to the Army of Northern Virginia, I can never forget that your ranks wer
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Stray leaves from a soldier's Journal. (search)
ppearance of a rout. Soldiers from every command were straggling all over the country, and our once grand army was rapidly melting away. On every side the Federals were capturing our wagon trains, artillery, etc., and in the meantime picked up thousands of our men, who were too nearly starved to fight. Marched to the High Bridge, over the Appomattox, and reached that point late at night, remaining there until next morning, when we moved in the direction of Farmville. Stampede. Friday, April 7th.—Moved within two miles of Farmville, where we halted to rest. Most of us busied ourselves in preparing a lunch composed of anything we could get. I had finished my delicious (to me) meal, consisting of a savory slap jack, and was lying on the ground, quietly taking my ease, when all at once a commotion arose and the drivers commenced hitching up in a hurry; for once the gallant, though somewhat lazy, Fourth Detachment, was on time. There was no hollooing for Jack Crump, Jack was rea