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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 1,192 1,192 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 16 16 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 13 13 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 12 12 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 11 11 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 10 10 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 9 9 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 11, 1863., [Electronic resource] 9 9 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 8 8 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 8 8 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies.. You can also browse the collection for April 9th or search for April 9th in all documents.

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Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies., Biographical note. (search)
twice wounded and his horse was shot under him. For his conspicuous gallantry in this action, he was promoted to the brevet rank of Major-General. In the fight at White Oak Road, March 31st, although seriously disabled by wounds, General Chamberlain distinguished himself by recovering a lost field; while in the battle of Five Forks, of April 1st, his promptitude and skillful handling of troops received again official commendation. In the final action near Appomattox Court House on the ninth of April, Chamberlain was called by General Sheridan to replace the leading division of cavalry, and the first flag of truce from Longstreet came to Chamberlain's headquarters. His Corps Commander says in an official report: In the final action, General Chamberlain had the advance, and at the time the announcement of the surrender was made he was driving the enemy rapidly before him. At the surrender of Lee's army, General Chamberlain was designated to command the parade, and it was character
Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies., Military order of the Loyal Legion of the United States: headquarters Commandery of the State of Maine. (search)
January following he was mustered out. Immediately after the surrender, General Griffin, his corps commander, addressed a special communication to headquarters urging General Chamberlain's promotion to the full rank of Major General for distinguished and gallant services on the left, including the White Oak Road, Five Forks and Appotomattox Court House, where, says General Griffin, his bravery and efficiency were such as to entitle him to the highest commendation. In the last action, the 9th of April, his command had the advance, and was driving the enemy rapidly before it when the announcement of General Lee's surrender was made. The recommendation was cordially approved by Generals Meade and Grant and forwarded to Washington where assurances were given that the promotion should be made. The limitations of this memorial permit only the mere outline of General Chamberlain's services. It would require a volume to do them justice. Much information in regard to them may be found i