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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 1,192 1,192 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 16 16 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 13 13 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 12 12 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 11 11 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 10 10 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 9 9 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 11, 1863., [Electronic resource] 9 9 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 8 8 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 8 8 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for April 9th or search for April 9th in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 2: bombardment and fall of Fort Sumter.--destruction of the Norfolk Navy Yard by the Federal officers. (search)
ted by a few shot and shell. The story of that day is known to all who read history, and it is not necessary to further refer to it, excepting in connection with the naval expedition which was fitted out in the earlier part of April to go to the relief of Sumter, the history of which will appear further on in this narrative. Secretary Welles, with a decision worthy of the occasion, did fit out an expedition for the relief of Sumter, the last vessel of which sailed from New York on the 9th of April, but owing to various reasons did not reach Charleston harbor in time to be of any use, and the attack on the fort commenced soon after the leading vessels showed themselves off the bar. A number of the smaller vessels never arrived at all, and under the circumstances could have been of no use had they arrived twenty-four hours before the attack. The expedition arrived only to see the declaration of war between the North and the South, which was promulgated by the thunder of cannon and t
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 3: closing of Southern ports.--increase of the Navy.--list of vessels and their stations.--purchased vessels.--vessels constructing, etc. (search)
in May. June 29   Santee Portsmouth, N. H April 17 May 27 June 20 Sloops--           Savannah New York April 1 June 1 July 10   Jamestown Philadelphia April 9 May 18 June 8   Vincennes Boston April 9 June 24 July 12   Marion Portsmouth April 20 June 30 July 14   Dale Portsmouth April 20 June 30 July 17   PreApril 9 June 24 July 12   Marion Portsmouth April 20 June 30 July 14   Dale Portsmouth April 20 June 30 July 17   Preble Boston April 20 June 22 July 11 Brigs--           Bainbridge Boston April 20 May 1 May 21   Perry New York April 20 May 1 May 14 Steamers--           Roanoke New York April 20 June 20 June 25   Colorado Boston April 20 June 3 June 18   Minnesota Boston April 3 May 2 May 8   Wabash New York April 9 April April 9 April 29 May 30   Pensacola Washington         Mississippi Boston April 6 May 18 May 23   Water Witch Philadelphia Feb. 14 April 10 April 17 When the vessels then building and purchased of every class, were armed, equipped, and ready for service, the condition of the Navy would be as follows: