Browsing named entities in William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for April 9th or search for April 9th in all documents.

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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 2: Barnstable County. (search)
ndred and fifty dollars. December 9th, The town voted to enlist volunteers for three years service and not for nine months, and to pay to each volunteer for that term a bounty of two hundred dollars. 1863. Several war-meetings were held during this year: recruiting, the payment of bounties to volunteers, and aid to their families were continued; but no special action was taken by the town, in its corporate capacity, in relation to the war. 1864. A legal town-meeting was held on the 9th of April, at which seventy-eight hundred dollars were appropriated to fill the quotas of the town under the calls of the President for men, Oct. 17, 1863, and Feb. 1, 1864. Mr. Colly, the town-clerk, writes:— I have sent you all the votes of importance relating to the war. Many other votes were passed, and much excitement existed during these years of trial; but they were so similar to the within, that to repeat them would be useless. Sandwich must have furnished for the army and navy a
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 3: Berkshire County. (search)
void. October 11th, It having been found that the notes thus given could not be negotiated, and were therefore unsuited for the purpose, the town voted to pay the bounty in money. 1863. July 25th, The selectmen were authorized to borrow money to pay State aid to the families of drafted men. September 26th, Voted, to raise seven thousand two hundred and forty-seven dollars and fifty-two cents to settle bounty money, as provided in section 9th of chapter 218 of the Acts of 1863. 1864. April 9th, The bounty for volunteers for three years service was fixed at one hundred and twenty-five dollars, which was the amount paid to each until the end of the war. Several meetings were held during the year to appropriate money for State aid and recruiting purposes, and power was given to the selectmen to recruit men, borrow money, and pay bounties. The town of Lee, according to the return made by the selectmen in 1866, furnished two hundred and ninety-five men for the war; but as the town
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 4: Bristol County. (search)
of money to repay to citizens money advanced by them for recruiting purposes, not exceeding one hundred and twenty-five dollars for each man enlisted. On the 9th of April a town-meeting was held, at which it was voted to raise an amount not exceeding one hundred and twenty-five dollars, for bounty to each volunteer who should enat the city hall. March 4th, State aid was directed to be paid to the families of colored citizens who shall be mustered into the service of the United States. April 9th, Five hundred dollars were authorized to be expended on the enlistment of a company of heavy artillery, which on the 21st of May was increased to one thousand dote citizens for the purpose of procuring volunteers to fill the quotas of the town, under calls made by the President for men. Another meeting was held on the 9th of April, at which it was voted to pay to each volunteer who enlists in the military service, and is credited to the quota of the town, a bounty of one hundred and twen
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 10: Middlesex County. (search)
e recruiting committee and to encourage enlistments. 1863. December 5th, The recruiting committee reported that it would be necessary to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer, in order to fill the quota of the town under the pending call of the President for more men, and it was decided that the money to pay these bounties be raised by private subscription; and Nathan Simonds, Oakes Tirrill, and Otis Cutter were added to the recruiting committee. 1864. April 9th, It was unanimously voted to authorize the treasurer, under the direction of the selectmen, to refund the money contributed for recruiting purposes by private citizens of the town during the year 1863, and to raise the same by taxation; also to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each of five men who will volunteer to fill the quota of the town, under the last call of the President for two hundred thousand men; and William Winn and Oakes Tirrill were chosen to recruit t
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 15: Worcester County. (search)
se purposes. 1863. November 3d, Voted, that the families of conscripts, disabled soldiers, and those who have died in the service of the United States be placed on the same footing as regards State aid as the families of volunteers. 1864. April 9th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer enlisting to the quota of the town for three years service under the recent call of the President. 1865. August 5th, Voted, to refund the money to all individuat of bounties paid to volunteers; also, a sum of money to pay State aid to the families of men who are or may be drafted into the United States service. 1864. March 6th, Four thousand dollars were appropriated for aid to soldiers' families. April 9th, The selectmen were authorized to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who enlists for three years service and is credited to the quota of the town. On the 8th of August it was voted to pay this bounty in gold