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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 338 338 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 13 13 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 13 13 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 12 12 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 12 12 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 12 Browse Search
Isaac O. Best, History of the 121st New York State Infantry 10 10 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 9 9 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 8 8 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 6 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for April 10th or search for April 10th in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 3: closing of Southern ports.--increase of the Navy.--list of vessels and their stations.--purchased vessels.--vessels constructing, etc. (search)
uth April 20 June 30 July 17   Preble Boston April 20 June 22 July 11 Brigs--           Bainbridge Boston April 20 May 1 May 21   Perry New York April 20 May 1 May 14 Steamers--           Roanoke New York April 20 June 20 June 25   Colorado Boston April 20 June 3 June 18   Minnesota Boston April 3 May 2 May 8   Wabash New York April 9 April 29 May 30   Pensacola Washington         Mississippi Boston April 6 May 18 May 23   Water Witch Philadelphia Feb. 14 April 10 April 17 When the vessels then building and purchased of every class, were armed, equipped, and ready for service, the condition of the Navy would be as follows: Old Navy. Number of vessels. Guns. Tonnage. 6 Ships of the Line (useless) 504 16,094 7 Frigates (useless) 350 12,104 17 Sloops (useless) 342 16,031 2 Brigs (useless) 12 539 3 Storeships 7 342 6 Receiving Ships, &c. 106 6,340 6 Screw Frigates 222 21,460 6 First-class Screw Sloops 109
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 8: capture of Fernandina and the coast South of Georgia. (search)
s absence from Port Royal, the Army had planted batteries of rifled guns and Columbiads on Tybee Island for the purpose of reducing Fort Pulaski: but as this was purely a military operation, the Flag Officer did not claim to interfere, although General Hunter permitted the Navy to take part in the bombardment, allowing a detachment of officers and seamen from the Wabash to serve one of the breaching batteries. The detachment under Commander C. R. P. Rodgers reached Tybee Island on the 10th of April, just before the firing commenced, but too late to take part in it that day. On the following morning the firing continued with excellent effect, the rifled shots boring through the brick work, while the shots from the Columbiads broke off great masses of masonry from the walls. Four rifled guns in battery, about 1,600 yards distant from the fort, had been assigned to the detachment from the Wabash, and no doubt the most skillful gunners in the ship were assigned to the management
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 41: the Red River expedition, under Major-General N. P. Banks, assisted by the Navy under Rear-Admiral David D. Porter. (search)
e Little Red River at Elkins' Ferry — a movement so skillfully planned and so promptly executed that the enemy only by accident learned of it after it was accomplished. General Thayer had not yet joined Steele, having been delayed by bad roads, for the heavy rains made terrible work for the army, causing the route to be almost impassable, so that it was necessary to corduroy it. Thayer at length arrived, and crossed the Little Red River on a bridge constructed by the soldiers. On the 10th of April the army moved to Prairie, where Price, the Confederate General, had determined to make a final stand at the point he had chosen; two branches diverge from the main road to Shreveport--one going to Washington, the other to Camden. Here some artillery firing took place which lasted until nightfall. After dark the enemy made a desperate effort to capture the Federal guns, but were repulsed with heavy loss, and retreated to their fortifications of earth and timber, a mile long, commanding
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 42: Red River expedition.--continued. (search)
the campaign do not at all support the reckless and fiery ardor of this statement. The fleet did not reach the place appointed until two full days after the first decisive battle with the enemy. The Admiral occupied four days in moving one hundred and four miles on what he calls a rising river, with good water, to the place appointed. General T. Kilby Smith states that the fleet made twenty miles on the 7th,fifty-seven miles on the 8th, eighteen miles on the 9th, and nine miles on the 10th of April--total, one hundred and four miles. The failure of the fleet to move up the river with ordinary expedition, together with the fact that the gun-boats were unable to pass Grand Ecore until the 7th, justified the belief that its advance had been prevented by the low stage of water, and governed the Army exclusively in its retrograde movement to Grand Ecore, as it did in every important operation of the campaign. The Admiral's dispatch does not mention the fact that, in addition to the mer