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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 338 338 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 13 13 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 13 13 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 12 12 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 12 12 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 12 Browse Search
Isaac O. Best, History of the 121st New York State Infantry 10 10 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 9 9 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 8 8 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 6 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for April 10th or search for April 10th in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Munford's Marylanders never surrendered to foe. From Richmond, Va., Times-dispatch, February 6, 1910. (search)
us command which cut its way out on Eve of Lee's surrender. By John R. Stonebraker. After repulsing the Yankees when we made the last charge at Appomattox, and General Munford, having most emphatically declined to be included in the surrender of General R. E. Lee's army, General Munford's command moved off slowly and unmolested, reaching Lynchburg that afternoon. The First Maryland Cavalry crossed the James River about dark and encamped in the Fair Grounds. At sunrise the next morning, April 10, we were formed in line, and Colonel Dorsey informed us that it had been determined at yesterday's conference to disband the cavalry for a short time. Acting upon this agreement, we were free to go where we pleased until April 25, when he would expect every man to meet him at the Cattle Scales, in Augusta county. We at once broke ranks; our color-bearer, John Ridgely, stripped our beloved flag from its staff, placed it in his haversack, and carried it with him to Albemarle county, Va. The