Browsing named entities in Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). You can also browse the collection for April 17th or search for April 17th in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book I:—Richmond. (search)
nd men they could have massed on that strip of land. This unfortunate affair produced a sad impression on the mind of the soldiers who had seen their comrades sacrificed without any orders being given to go to their assistance. It was moreover the signal for new delays. On the following day, General McClellan decided to resort to the sure but slow means of a regular siege. The surroundings of Yorktown alone afforded means of approach well adapted for this kind of attack; and on the 17th of April, the first parallel was opened at the head of a ravine situated about two thousand metres from one of the bastions. The inventive and laborious genius of the Americans had there an opportunity to signalize itself. The whole army set to work to cut roads, to construct bridges, to prepare places d'armes, to establish wharves, to dig trenches, and to erect batteries. Nothing was to be seen except manufactures of gabions and fascines. The siege equipage was landed, by dint of patience an
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book II:—the naval war. (search)
my's position had been reconnoitred, and the edge of the wood which covers the right bank below Fort Jackson was selected as the best position for the mortar-boats. Having been delayed by want of coal, the fleet was unable to start until the 17th of April, while Butler, who had arrived from Ship Island with nine thousand men, was waiting for the issue of the conflict at the entrance of the river, to land his troops upon some tenable ground. At this period the whole of the Mississippi delta waies to approach Savannah and penetrate into the interior. They kept a careful guard over all the points through which the Federal troops stationed on Tybee Island might try to obtain a foothold on the continent. Thus it happened that on the 17th of April the Eighth Michigan, having been sent on a reconnaissance in the Wilmington canal, soon found itself in the presence of an enemy ready for battle. These troops had hardly landed from the steamers which had brought them when they were assaile