Browsing named entities in William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for April 18th or search for April 18th in all documents.

Your search returned 12 results in 8 document sections:

William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 3: Berkshire County. (search)
$1,168.36. Pittsfield Incorporated April 21, 1761. Population in 1860, 8,045; in 1865, 9,679. Valuation in 1860, $5,059,907; in 1865, $6,378,878. The selectmen in 1861, 1862, 1863, 1864, and 1865, were John C. West, Henry Colt, and Chauncey Goodrich. The town-clerk in 1861, 1862, 1863, and 1864, was James Warriner; in 1865, James M. Barker. The town-treasurer during all of these years was Josiah Carter. 1861. A large meeting of the citizens of Pittsfield was held on the 18th of April; at which a committee was appointed to aid the volunteers of the Pittsfield company, which had been ordered to join the Eighth Regiment at Springfield and proceed to Washington for a service of three months; and to make suitable provision for the comfort of their families during their absence. At a legal town-meeting, held on the 22d of May, the action of the citizens' committee was approved; and the committee were authorized to continue in the performance of their duties. 1862. Mar
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 4: Bristol County. (search)
paid. August 19th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and fifty dollars to each volunteer for nine months service who enlists and is credited to the quota of the town. December 6th, The bounty was raised to two hundred dollars to each volunteer, to fill the quota of the town, whether he is an inhabitant of the town of Easton or otherwise. 1863. No action appears to have been necessary by the town, in its corporate capacity, to fill its quota of volunteers during this year. 1864. April 18th, The town voted to refund to the contributors three-fourths of the money paid by them to assist in filling the quotas of the town, of volunteers for military service, under the calls of the President of October, 1863, and February, 1864; also, to raise by taxation ten thousand dollars for recruiting expenses, and the payment of bounties to volunteers to fill the quota of Easton, under the recent calls of the President for more men. July 26th, Voted, to raise money by taxation, and to pay a
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 6: Essex County. (search)
y as they might deem proper, provided the recruit agreed to refund the same from his State bounty when received; and five hundred dollars were set apart for that purpose. A committee of six was chosen to co-operate with the selectmen. 1864. April 18th, The selectmen were authorized to borrow whatever sums of money they might require to procure recruits for the quota of the town, upon any call of the President up to the 1st of March, 1865, provided the bounty paid to each volunteer shall not ants of those who comprise these companies, or their families. May 16th, Five thousand dollars additional were appropriated for the same purpose, and in October following another appropriation of three thousand dollars was made. On the 18th of April a petition of Daniel Saunders, Jr., and others, was presented to the city council, asking an appropriation for the purpose of equipping a regiment of volunteer militia; and five thousand dollars were appropriated for that purpose. At the sam
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 8: Hampden County. (search)
No action appears to have been taken by the town, in its corporate capacity, during this year, in matters relating to the war, although recruiting went on, and the payment of State aid to the soldiers' families was continued. 1864. On the 18th of April the selectmen were authorized to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer, or drafted man, for three years service, who shall be mustered into the military service and credited to the quota of the town; and the try A, Forty-sixth Regiment, and Albert F. Folsom was chosen to fill the vacancy, and has remained in office ever since. 1861. The first action taken by the city, in regard to the war, was the passage of a resolve by the city council on the 18th of April appropriating five thousand dollars to assist the military companies of Springfield in making necessary preparations for entering upon active military service. On the 29th of the same month twenty thousand dollars were appropriated for the s
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 9: Hampshire County. (search)
rn to support. Resolved, That if there should be a failure to get the number of men called for by voluntary enlistment, we would recommend to the Government to call out by draft five hundred thousand men, to take the field and uphold the Constitution. August 30th, Voted to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer for nine months service, who shall enlist and be credited to the quota of the town, and the treasurer was authorized to borrow money for that purpose. 1864. April 18th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow not exceeding four thousand six hundred and twenty-five dollars to pay citizens who had contributed money for the payment of bounties since Oct. 17, 1863; also to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who had enlisted to fill the quota of the town since Feb. 6, 1864, by reenlist-ment from old regiments. July 30th, Fifty-five hundred dollars were appropriated to pay the forty-four men the town is called upon to furnish
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 10: Middlesex County. (search)
mpanies were tendered to the Governor, should troops be called for by the President. April 15th, The Sixth Regiment having been ordered to Washington, formed in Lowell, where it was addressed by leading citizens, and then proceeded to Boston. April 18th, Eight thousand dollars were appropriated for aid to the soldiers' families. The national flag was ordered to be displayed upon the public buildings. April 19th, Authority was given to gentlemen to organize new military companies. The attackR. Litchfield, Elbridge Teel. The town-clerk in 1861, 1862, 1863, and 1864 was Joseph P. Hall; in 1865, Parker R. Litchfield. The town-treasurer during all of these years was George B. Green. 1861. A meeting of citizens was held on the 18th of April, at which the following preamble and resolutions were adopted:— Whereas the President of the United States has called upon all true and loyal citizens to aid and support the General Government, and to protect the property and enforce the
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 14: Suffolk County. (search)
Rufus Trussell, James B. Forsyth, John H. Osgood, Maurice M. Pigott, Eben W. Lothrop, Joseph Everdean, Samuel W. Mason, aldermen. In 1865, Eustace C. Fitz, mayor; Albert Bisbee, Elisha H. Ryder, Jesse Gould, William O. Haskell, Eben W. Lothrop, Maurice M. Pigott, Joseph Everdean, Samuel W. Mason, aldermen. The city-clerk and city-treasurer during all these years was Samuel Bassett. 1861. The first meeting of the city council to act upon matters relating to the war was held on the 18th of April, at which the treasurer was authorized to pay out of the city treasury under the direction of the committee on police three thousand dollars, or so much thereof as may be necessary to fit out the Chelsea Light Infantry, or any other military organization raised in the city, that may be called into active service, and to provide for the families of the men who shall be mustered in to said service. The use of the city hall was granted to the Chelsea Light Infantry for drilling purposes.
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 15: Worcester County. (search)
poses, although recruiting and the payment of State aid went on as before. 1864. March 28th, Voted, to raise the sum of four thousand dollars for the purpose of filling the quota of the town on the recent call of the President for more men. April 18th, Voted, to appropriate thirty-five hundred dollars to aid the families of volunteers. June 10th, Voted, to raise five thousand dollars to recruit volunteers to fill the quota of the town under any call or order of the President of the United Sone hundred and twenty-five dollars. 1863. March 2d, The treasurer was authorized to borrow a sum not exceeding two thousand dollars to pay State aid to the families of volunteers. 1864. March 7th, A vote similar to the above was passed. April 18th, Five hundred dollars were appropriated for bounties and recruiting purposes. June 20th, Six hundred and twenty-five dollars were granted for recruits furnished in place of drafted men. August 15th, The sum of one hundred and twenty-five dolla