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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., General Grant on the Wilderness campaign. (search)
h his cavalry, was started on a raid against the Danville Railroad, which he struck at Coalfield, Powhatan, and Chula stations, destroying them, the railroad track, two freight trains, and one locomotive, together with large quantities of commissary and other stores; thence, crossing to the South Side Road, struck it at Wilson's, Wellsville, and Black's and White's stations, destroying the road and station-houses; thence he proceeded to City Point, which he reached on the 18th. On the 19th of April, and prior to the movement of General Butler, the enemy, with a land force under General Hoke and an iron-clad ram, attacked Plymouth, N. C., commanded by General H. W. Wessells, and our gun-boats there; and, after severe fighting, the place was carried by assault, and the entire garrison and armament captured. The gun-boat Smithfield was sunk, and the Miami disabled. The army sent to operate against Richmond having hermetically sealed itself up at Bermuda Hundred, the enemy was enab
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Operations South of the James River. (search)
lad been quietly assembled on the Blackwater, intending to take Suffolk by assault; but finding the place well prepared for defense, after repeated unsuccessful attempts on our lines, in all of which he was signally repulsed, he sat down before it and commenced an investment according to the most improved principles of military science. The chief engagements during the siege were an attack, April 14th, by the Confederate land batteries on the gunboats in the Nansemond, and the capture, April 19th, of Battery Huger, at the mouth of the West Branch, by a combined force from the Union army and navy, under General George W. Getty and Lieutenant B. H. Lamson, commanding the flotilla in the upper Nansemond. The force under General Longstreet at the time of the closest investment numbered 20,000. March 31st, General Peek had 15,000, and April 30th nearly 25,000.--editors. As first organized it was arranged as follows: First Brigade, 3d New York, and 1st District of Columbia Cavalry, Col
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 13.95 (search)
The destruction of the Albemarle. by W. B. Cushing, commander, U. S. N. Part of the smoke-stack of the Albemarle. In September, 1864, the Government was laboring under much anxiety in regard to the condition of affairs in the sounds of North Carolina. Some months previous (April 19th) a rebel iron-clad had made her appearance, attacking and recapturing Plymouth, beating our fleet, and sinking the Southfield. Some time after (May 5th), this iron-clad, the Albemarle, had steamed out into the open sound and engaged seven of our steamers, doing much damage and suffering little. The Sassacus had attempted to run her down, but had failed, and had had her boiler exploded. [See p. 628.] The Government had no iron-clad that could cross Hatteras bar and enter the sounds, Several light-draught monitors were in course of construction at this time, but were not yet completed.--editors. and it was impossible for any number of our vessels to injure the ram at Plymouth. At thi
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the campaign of the Carolinas. (search)
roled at Greensboro' was 30,045 ; at Salisbury, 2987, and at Charlotte, 4015, making a grand total of 37,047. General Johnston ( Narrative, p. 410) says: The meeting between General Sherman and myself, and the armistice that followed, produced great uneasiness in the army. It was very commonly believed among the soldiers that there was to be a surrender, by which they would be prisoners of war, to which they were very averse. This apprehension caused a great number of desertions between the 19th and 24th of April--not less than 4000 in the infantry and artillery, and almost as many from the cavalry. The Confederate loss in action at Rivers's Bridge, S. C., was 8 killed, 44 wounded, and 45 captured or missing = 97. Near Kinston, N. C., there were 11 killed, 107 wounded, and 16 captured or missing = 134. The loss at Averysboro' is estimated at about 700. At Bentonville it was 239 killed, 1694 wounded, and 673 captured or missing = 2606. With regard to the latter, however, Genera
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Closing operations in the James River. (search)
fense of the Nansemond, April 12-26. A sudden movement in force was made by the Confederates to cross the river and thereby reach Suffolk to attack General Peck. Admiral Lee hastily dispatched two flotillas to hold the line of the river: one composed of the Stepping Stones and seven other gun-boats under Lieutenant R. H. Lamson, in the upper Nansemond, and the other of four gun-boats under Lieutenant William B. Cushing, in the lower waters. Of special importance were the capture on the 19th of April of the battery at Hill's Point, by Lieutenant Lamson's flotilla, in conjunction with three hundred men under General Getty, and a landing expedition on the 22d to Chuckatuck, several miles inland, under Lieutenant Gushing. After several months of inaction it was decided in August, 1863, to make a reconnoissance up the James River. The force consisted of the monitor Sangamon, the ferry-boat Commodore Barney, and the small steamer Cohasset, all under the command of Captain G. Gansevoor
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 18.114 (search)
ent shops, three paper mills, over 100,000 rounds of artillery, ammunition, besides immense stores of which no account could be taken. The rebels abandoned and burned the gun-boat Chattahoochee twelve miles below Columbus. On the 18th the command was on the march to Macon, the Second Division, under General R. H. G. Minty, who had succeeded General Long (wounded at Selma), having the advance. On nearing Macon, April 20th, Wilson received a communication from General Beauregard, dated April 19th, informing him of the truce between Johnston and Sherman. [See p. 755.] The advance had already dashed into the city and received the surrender, and Generals Gustavus W. Smith, Howell Cobb, and W. W. Mackall, of the garrison, were held as prisoners of war. On the 21st a communication from General Sherman reached Wilson directing him to suspend hostilities until notified of the result of the negotiations then pending. General Croxton reported at Macon with his brigade, on May 1st. Gene